Sound travels on Mars at two different speeds

Scientists have recently discovered that unlike Earth, Mars has two speeds of sound, and sound waves behave differently at different frequencies.

BingMag.com Sound travels on Mars at two different speeds

Scientists have recently discovered that unlike Earth, Mars has two speeds of sound, and sound waves behave differently at different frequencies.

  • Listen to the recorded sound from Mars; A New Dimension of the Red Planet for Humans

But these microphones pick up other sounds as well, such as those made by the astronaut himself when his wheels hit the ground, or by his companion bird. The "Ingenuity" robotic helicopter is created. For example, the Supercom instrument has a laser that fiercely fires at more scientifically interesting rocks for further analysis.

According to Naomi Murdoch, a planetary scientist at the Suprieur de Suprieur de l'Aronautique et de l'Espace) In Toulouse, France, the microcomputer supercomputer captures the sounds of laser images to help researchers understand the hardness of the target material. Murdoch, Chid et al. , Listened to the sound of the laser. When a laser hits a target, it explodes, creating a sound wave, and because scientists know when the laser is fired and how far away the target is, they can measure the speed at which a sound wave travels through the air toward a supercomputer microphone. p>

The sound of a laser strike

This sound recorded by a microphone on NASA's persistent astronaut on Mars, the sound It has recorded the robot's laser impact on the rocks of Mars.

Thus, the speed of this sound has been measured at about 250 meters per second. It is slower than the ground, where sound travels in the air at a speed of about 340 meters per second. The lower speed is not surprising because what we hear as sound is actually pressure waves passing through an environment such as air, and the speed of those waves depends on the density and composition of the material environment.

Our planet's atmosphere is 160 times The density of the atmosphere on Mars is higher than that of nitrogen and oxygen, while the air on Mars is mostly carbon dioxide. So the sound moves more slowly in different Martian air.

BingMag.com Sound travels on Mars at two different speeds

The team also used the Supercom Microphone to listen to the lower spin of the genius helicopter blades and found that a second speed of sound On the surface of Mars, at frequencies below 240 Hz or slightly below the middle C on the piano (double middle note or C4), there is: 240 meters per second.

This sound recorded from the same microphone recorded the wind and the whisper around the wings of the genius helicopter as it landed about 80 meters from the astronaut.

This finding is while on the ground, sound travels only one speed in the air, regardless of the pitch of the sound. According to researchers, two different speeds of sound on Mars are due to its carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. When sound waves with frequencies above 240 Hz travel in the air compared to waves below 240 Hz, carbon dioxide molecules behave differently, affecting the speed of the waves.

"We have proven "That we can do interesting scientific work with the microphone on Mars and produce good scientific data." These sounds are influenced by air pressure, so researchers can use audio data to track accurate changes in air pressure over short periods of time, thereby learning more about Mars' climate. While other astronauts have wind, temperature and pressure sensors, they can only Record changes over longer periods of time.

"Another way is to help all of us feel there." "The pressure on Mars changes a lot throughout the year as the seasons change," Trainer said. "I'm really excited to see how this data collected will change in the coming seasons."

Cover Photo: Graphic Design of Sound on Mars
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Source: Science News

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