Something similar to cat hair got stuck in NASA’s Mars rover sampling system

NASA's industrious rover has found what looks like cat hair in its sampling drill, which has caught the attention of scientists.

BingMag.com Something similar to cat hair got stuck in NASA’s Mars rover sampling system

NASA's industrious rover has found what looks like cat hair in its sampling drill, which has caught the attention of scientists.

Always After each use of one of the tools on the Perseverance rover's arm, the mission engineering team takes pictures of the tool to make sure everything is still working properly. The rover was used to take a rock core sample on the Red Planet, thus collecting the 12th such sample, now stored and sealed for future retrieval by a separate mission.

After That mission control team took pictures of the drill and the components of the sample collection system. But in these images, not everything was normal, but two small pieces of debris were visible: a small object on the sampler and a small hair-like object on the drill hole.

Art Thompson, Project Manager At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, he said of the extra material in the sampling system: "The team is now investigating the origin of the debris to determine if it is from the rover itself or from foreign debris from the Mars Entry System, landing and landing on the surface that initially The mission was thrown in the other direction.

BingMag.com Something similar to cat hair got stuck in NASA’s Mars rover sampling system

The small pieces of rock around the sampling wheel are probably leftover material from that a drill was used to remove the twelfth sample.

Experts took more photos of the sampling wheel and the drill hole, as well as the area on the surface where the rock core was taken, looking for fibers or additional rock fragments. that can help clarify the issue. Other diagnostic work will be done this week, Thompson said.

Earlier this year, the team had to perform a special maneuver with a drill to remove chunks of rock. This process was done by bending the mouth of the drill towards the surface of Mars and falling pieces of rock. The team will now determine whether a similar maneuver could remove fresh rock fragments from the rover's sampling system.

The drill is a rotary impact drill designed to extract rock cores from the Martian surface. . The drill has two modes: rotating under constant pressure and impact, in which the drill is accompanied by a hammer-like impact. This assembly is located at the end of the rover's robotic arm, which is like a hand that carries scientific cameras, mineral and chemical analyzers, and a drill.

  • The Noodle Story What is the Martian seen by the Perseverance probe? Meanwhile, Erin Gibbons, a member of the rover's science team, pointed out that they are using this opportunity to look more closely at the rocks and Look at the soil around the rover. One of the advantages of keeping persistence constant while collecting foreign object data in the drill is that it allows enough time to check the rock around the wheels, he said. We are surrounded by bedrock and very attractive broken blocks that have sunk into the delta.

    Photos: The status of the Perseverance rover's sampling system after collecting the 12th sample from the surface of Mars
    Credit: NASA/JPL- Caltech

    Sources: Universe Today, Tweak Town

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