The second strangely powerful radio signal was detected 3 billion light-years away

Astronomers using the world's largest radio telescopes to identify the second new type of fast radio eruption that reached us more than 3 billion light-years away

BingMag.com The second strangely powerful radio signal was detected 3 billion light-years away

Astronomers using the world's largest radio telescopes to identify the second new type of fast radio eruption that reached us more than 3 billion light-years away

This new "rapid radio burst" (FRB), called FRB 190520, is strong evidence that several celestial bodies could be the source of these mysterious signals. This new object is the second to be detected, which not only produces repetitive fast radio bursts, but also emits a constant source of weaker radiation among the bursts.

Rapid radio bursts were first observed in 2007. Which in just a few milliseconds release more energy than the sun in a year. Astronomers have long been puzzled about the source of these sudden sparks. But because these explosions are often seen farther away from galaxies millions or even billions of light-years away and erupt quickly and often only once, identifying their sources is very challenging.

  • Mysterious radio signals from the heart of the Milky Way galaxy have baffled scientists

Detect a magnet that is a highly magnetic shell with the rapid rotation of a dead star. Magnets are a special type of neutron star, like the bodies of very dense stars left over from supernova explosions, and have a magnetic field trillions of times stronger than Earth. But scientists are not sure that all rapid radio bursts originate from magnets. Strangely enough, flashes of some of these fast radio bursts are repeated, sometimes in a short burst and sometimes in several scattered events. The first and most active of these repetitive eruptions is FRB 121102.

This unknown source is located in a dwarf galaxy 3 billion light-years away, sending radio waves from a compact region into a 157-day cycle. It emits 90 days of strong and repetitive radio blasts and 67 days of milder and weaker radio broadcasts. FRB 121102 is so active that it has published 1652 flares over a 47-day period, and for a time astronomers thought it was unique.

BingMag.com The second strangely powerful radio signal was detected 3 billion light-years away

Graphic design of a neutron star with a very strong magnetic field
Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF

According to an article published in the June 8 issue of the journal Nature, researchers take their first general look at the new high-speed radio explosion, the FRB 190520, using a spherical radio telescope with a 500-meter aperture in China. (FAST) observed.

Fast observations confirmed that the distant mass emits intermittent and repetitive radio bursts, and subsequent observations made with the New Mexico "Very Large Array" (VLA) determined its location. determined. Scientists have discovered that the source of repeated explosions, much like their counterpart, is located in a dwarf galaxy, about 3 billion light-years from Earth. The VLA also confirmed that the FRB 190520 source is small and compact, with weaker radio emissions among larger eruptions. Reinforces the possibility of two different types of FRB. "Are duplicate FRBs different from non-duplicate FRBs?" Said Kshitij Aggarwal, co-author of the study from the University of West Virginia. Is continuous radio emission a common occurrence?

Astronomers believe that there are either two or more completely different mechanisms for producing these stunning cosmic glows, or that these explosions by space objects, in very different stages. Arise from their cosmic evolution.

Some indirect evidence supports the second hypothesis. Because fast radio bursts often come in the form of single pulses of unknown origin, astronomers often estimate the distance of radio waves emitted by FRBs by frequency (such as light after passing through a prism) because the more they collide with free electrons in space. Yes, its frequency changes more. This effect, called scattering, gives a good guess of the distance traveled by a rapid radio burst, assuming the uniform scattering of electrons in space.

BingMag.com The second strangely powerful radio signal was detected 3 billion light-years away

Optical, infrared and radio image of FRB 190520 fast radio burst field
Credit: Niu et al

but ability Tracing the source location of FRB 190520 showed a strange mismatch. The radio waves from the pulsating body were scattered enough to indicate that they came from a mass between 8 and 9.5 billion light-years away, but astronomers studied the displacement. Doppler, or the wavelength of radio waves caused by the expansion of the universe, estimated its distance more accurately and found that it landed less than 3 billion light-years from Earth.

"This shows There are many materials near the FRB that challenge the use of it to measure intergalactic gas. "If this is true of other fast radio bursts, then we can not count on their use as cosmic standards." It is still shrouded in the supernova explosion that created it. But researchers need more measurements before they can be sure of this.

"Sarah Burke-Spolaor," another study author, said: "FRB research is advancing very fast. And new discoveries are published on a monthly basis. "Still, big questions remain, and this newly discovered mass gives us challenging clues to these questions."> Credit: Jingchuan Yu, Beijing Planetarium

Source: Live Science

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