Scientists have observed huge threads of the Tarantula Nebula in the neighborhood of our galaxy

A newly released image of the Tarantula Nebula in the Milky Way's neighborhood reveals spider-web-thin filaments of gas, a dramatic battle between gravity and energy. They show a star.

BingMag.com Scientists have observed huge threads of the Tarantula Nebula in the neighborhood of our galaxy

A newly released image of the Tarantula Nebula in the Milky Way's neighborhood reveals spider-web-thin filaments of gas, a dramatic battle between gravity and energy. They show a star.

This phenomenon observed in "30 Doradus" (30 Doradus), also known as "Tarantula Nebula", can help astronomers to understand how massive stars, These form the star-forming region and help explain why stars continue to be born within this molecular cloud.

High-resolution image of the Tarantula Nebula, located 170,000 light-years from Earth, based on data collected imaged by the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA).

Located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, the Tarantula Nebula is one of the brightest and most active star-forming regions in the galactic backyard. The mass of some of the stars born in it is more than 150 times that of the Sun.

In the heart of the Majestic cloud. Lani Bozor is a stellar nursery that has given birth to 800,000 stars, and half a million of them are hot, young, and massive stars. Thus, the tarantula nebula is one of the main targets for the study of star formation, but another unique feature increases its study value.

Guido De Marchi, a scientist of the European Space Agency and one "What makes 30 Dorados unique is that it is close enough that we can study in detail how stars form in it," said one of the authors of the paper published in the "Astrophysical Journal" and at the same time has similar properties. It has very distant galaxies; "Thanks to 30 Dorados, we can study how stars formed 10 billion years ago, when most stars were born," he added.>

The observed push and pull is caused by the large population of stars and gravity, with the former tearing the gas clouds into filament-like fragments and slowing star formation, and the latter trying to pull the gas clouds closer together. slow down and form stars.

BingMag.com Scientists have observed huge threads of the Tarantula Nebula in the neighborhood of our galaxy

The tarantula nebula In the radio spectrum showing hot gas and bright stars
Credit: ESO, M.-R. Cioni/VISTA Magellanic Cloud survey

Tony Wong, a professor in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Illinois, said: "These pieces may be the remnants of larger clouds that were destroyed by the enormous energy released by young and massive stars. The findings also showed that despite strong stellar feedback, gravity is still shaping the nebula and driving massive star formation.

This contrasts with previous knowledge of such star-forming regions, which suggested that the thin filaments of gas seen in the Tarantula nebula are broken up enough by this feedback process to allow them to re-approach and form new stars. Not gravity.

Wang continued: "Our results show that even in the presence of very strong feedback, gravity can have a strong effect and lead to continued star formation."

Observation of different masses of tarantula webs

The tarantula nebula has been well studied due to its properties, but what distinguishes the new research is the place of investigation. It is star formation. Although previous studies have focused more on the center of the nebula, the place of the densest gas and therefore the fastest star formation process, astronomers know that stars are formed in other regions of the nebula.

So instead of focusing on the heart of the nebula, this team High-resolution observations focused on another large region of the Tarantula Nebula. Taking this global approach to nebula observation, scientists have identified masses with a surprising pattern.

Wong, who works with the US National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), said: "We have previously observed interstellar gas clouds. We used to know the structures as puffy or round, but increasingly they are found to be string-like or filamentous. When we divided the cloud into masses based on the difference in density, we found that the densest masses are not randomly placed, but are completely arranged on these filaments. to map the large, cold gas clouds of the Tarantula Nebula that collapse in on themselves and form baby stars. They also observed how these gas clouds change as the young stars release more energy.

We expected that the parts of the cloud closest to the massive young stars would show the clearest signs of feedback dominance, Vovag said. show gravity, but we see that gravity is still subject to feedback in these regions, at least for parts of The cloud, which is dense enough, plays a prominent role.

Overlay of data collected by ALMA and an infrared image of the Tarantula Nebula showing stars and glowing hot gas from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Infrared Mapping Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) shows, creating a composite image that shows the vastness of gas clouds and their distinctive web-like shape.

While the team's findings reveal how gravity affects star-forming regions, This research is ongoing. Wang noted, "There is still more work to be done with this extraordinary data set, and we are releasing it publicly to encourage other researchers to do new research."

Future studies will also look at differences between galaxies. The Milky Way and the Tarantula Nebula will be focused on, including star formation rates. Because while our galaxy forms stars continuously, the Tarantula Nebula does so in cycles of ups and downs.

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Cover photo: Tarantula Nebula star-forming region
Credit: ESO, ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/Wong et al., ESO/M. -R. Cioni/VISTA Magellanic Cloud survey

Source: Space

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