Samsung: For privacy, destroy SSD before sending for replacement

Samsung has adopted a new and interesting policy to protect the privacy of users; The Korean company apparently asked a user to completely destroy his expensive 980 Pro SSD before sending it to a dealer for a replacement in the interest of privacy.

BingMag.com Samsung: For privacy, destroy SSD before sending for replacement

Samsung has adopted a new and interesting policy to protect the privacy of users; The Korean company apparently asked a user to completely destroy his expensive 980 Pro SSD before sending it to a dealer for a replacement in the interest of privacy.

It's no secret that Germany (and the European Union) In terms of protecting users' data and information, they have one of the strictest laws in the world. Although many of these strictures are aimed at large companies that have control over users' data and information online, some of them also cover offline services. It is now interesting to protect the privacy of certain users, not online but offline. According to the igorslab website, apparently when they wanted to send a 2TB 980 Pro SSD (one of the best and most expensive Samsung SSDs on the market of NVMe type) to a Samsung dealership for replacement, they were asked to completely destroy the SSD.

Unlike many other companies that only require users to return the SSD itself for repair or replacement, Samsung has decided that for a specific set of users, there is no need to worry about data leakage or issues such as data breaches. Not having privacy and such would allow them to destroy the SSD altogether, however expensive it may be. In the picture below, you can see that this user is removing the SSD flash module with a drill.

BingMag.com Samsung: For privacy, destroy SSD before sending for replacement

Apparently, after the user registers personal information, product name and model number, purchase document and product damage document, etc., he must upload a video or image as a document on the website. Now this video or image should include this whole process so that Samsung can make sure that the SSD didn't have any special problem before it was destroyed.

As it seems, there was a lot of communication between this person and Samsung. Many e-mails were exchanged, but the information related to all of them has remained confidential and has not been disclosed due to privacy concerns between the parties. According to Notebookcheck, apparently this person had stored very important and sensitive information on his SSD and was worried that maybe someone could access those data and information if the flash module was healthy. As a result, he was asked to completely destroy the SSD and destroy the flash module to be sure, because in this case, there will be no way to get the information.

Of course, in the text of this The report does not mention this issue in detail, but apparently this new policy will only apply to users who have confidential and very important information stored on their SSD. For example, those who work in important security organizations or institutions. Otherwise, normal users will most likely have to return the SSD to the company without needing to destroy it at all.

If this policy applies to all users, there should be more information about Be published with it so that everyone will be aware of it. Otherwise, it seems to only apply to specific users with critical data.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.