NASA research shows significant growth in glacier melting

These findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, help researchers identify potential risks of melting glaciers. For the communities below them, evaluate and better estimate the rate at which oceans are rising as melt ice is transferred to the sea.

During the largest study of glacial lakes, scientists, using 30 years of NASA satellite data, found that since 1990, with the help of 30 years of data from NASA satellite data. Glacier Melting Due to Global Warming, the volume of glacial lakes around the world has grown by about 50 percent.

These findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, help researchers identify potential risks of melting glaciers. For the communities below them, evaluate and better estimate the rate at which oceans are rising as melt ice is transferred to the sea.

We know that glaciers are shrinking on a large scale. This study provides a clearer picture of the amount of water stored following the melting of glaciers. "We know that not all melting water gets into the oceans right away," said Dan Shugar, lead author of the study at the University of Calgary in Canada. "So far, there is no data to estimate the amount of water stored in the lake or in groundwater."

This study estimates the volume of current glacial lakes at about 156 cubic kilometers.

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Sugar and his colleagues from departments and universities in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom during the "Mountain Asia" research program NASA originally intended to use satellite imagery and other remote sensing data to study 24 glacial lakes in highland Asia. High-mountainous Asia is a high geographical area that covers the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountain ranges such as the Himalayas.

Sugar added: "We have the necessary code for this study based on the Google Earth Engine, which An online platform for extensive analysis of geographic data, we wrote to explore high-altitude Asia first and then all of the world's glacial lakes. "Then, based on the area of this vast lake region, we created a scale relationship to estimate the size of the world's glacial lakes."

The research team eventually surveyed more than 250,000 views taken by the Landsat satellite. A decade ago, it was not possible to examine such a large amount of data. Sugar and colleagues reviewed the data over five time periods, starting in 1990, to examine all of the world's frozen regions except Antarctica and how glacial lakes are changing.

BingMag.com NASA research shows significant growth in glacier melting

Comparison of the volume of ice (light blue) and glacial lake (bold blue) in the Himalayas from 1990 to 2018
Credit: NASA/Lauren Dauphin

Sugar points out that although water from melting glaciers has little role in increasing the overall ocean water level, it can affect communities that They live downstream of these glaciers and make a big impact. Glacial lakes are not as stable as regular lakes because they are often caused by melting ice or the movement of ice deposits called "moraine" that loose rocks in the path of glacial waters. They are natural, they are formed.

These lakes can be completely unstable and may break the walls where they are stored and cause widespread flooding downstream. These types of floods, known as glacial lake outflows, have killed thousands of people and livestock and destroyed villages over the past century. In a recent example, the outbreak of a glacial lake in May 2020 affected Pakistan's Hunza Valley.

"This is a problem for people in many parts of the world who live in Living downstream of these glacial lakes is important, and in areas such as the Andes, Bhutan and Nepal such floods can be devastating. Fortunately, institutions such as the United Nations are monitoring and assisting to reduce these risks.

Despite widespread efforts to reduce global warming and the risks involved, including efforts to achieve sustainable fuels, Global warming is a serious threat to the earth, and conducting such research could help better understand how glaciers are changing and improve preventive measures.

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Cover Photo: Imja Glacial Lake near Mount Everest, which has nearly tripled in the past three decades. Credit: Planetary Science Institute/Jeffrey S. Kargel

Source: NASA

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