NASA’s payload went into the sky with a hook

SpinLaunch startup, which is active in the field of space launcher development using hook-and-loop method, in its 10th successful test operation, carried NASA's cargo sent to the sky.

BingMag.com NASA’s payload went into the sky with a hook

SpinLaunch startup, which is active in the field of space launcher development using hook-and-loop method, in its 10th successful test operation, carried NASA's cargo sent to the sky.

You may not have heard the name "SpinLaunch" until now because this company is one of the new players in the world of space launches and is not as well known as SpaceX or NASA. However, the company's suborbital accelerator, which is practically a space slingshot, has proven time and time again that it can play a role in the future of sending payloads into space. It launches more than 1600 kilometers per hour into the Earth's atmosphere. Now it has successfully completed its tenth suborbital test. In this test launch, payloads from NASA and other SpinLaunch partners were launched using the Hook method, and the results show a promising trend. . This vehicle can reach a speed of more than 1,600 kilometers per hour, and after release, as experienced in the Spinlaunch tests, it is literally thrown thousands of meters into the air.

This time for the 10th test. The system, SpinLaunch invited more than 150 people, including government officials, enthusiasts and NASA members, to Spaceport America, where it built the suborbital accelerator.

After loading. NASA and other partners' payloads in a test vehicle were eventually shot into the atmosphere by Spinlaunch using the Space Hook facility. The SpinLaunch launcher reached an altitude of about 7,600 meters this time, just like the previous tests.

As mentioned, this system is only a sub-orbital accelerator and not even the biggest accelerator that the company wants to build. Spinlaunch plans to build a larger space hook system that can deliver payloads to an altitude of 60 kilometers. The company is targeting 2026 for a launch into low Earth orbit.

It is hoped that orbital delivery systems such as SpinLaunch will be able to help put satellites and other equipment into orbit. This will save millions of liters of fuel, which in rockets like the Artemis 1 mission account for a large part of the costs. To resist the strong forces that are applied to them for throwing. In the current version, cargoes must be able to withstand an acceleration of 10,000 times the acceleration of gravity (G). An issue that becomes even more important with a larger accelerator.

Cover photo: SpinLaunch's Space Hook accelerator at the US Spaceport in New Mexico
Credit: SpinLaunch

Sources: BGR , Space

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