NASA has announced the release date of the first color images of the James Webb Telescope

As we approach the end of the observatory's preparation for scientific exploration, we are on the verge of an incredibly exciting period of discovery about our world. "The release of the first full-color web images will bring unique moments to all of us to marvel at a landscape that humans have never seen before," said NASA web program scientist Eric Smith. "These images will be the culmination of decades of sacrifice, talent and dreaming, but they are just the beginning." Behind the scenes of creating the first web images Deciding what the web should start with Look, it is a project that has been going on for more than five years and has been carried out by an international partnership between NASA, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore as a Web site and mission. "Our goal for the first Web images and data is to show the powerful telescope tools and to demonstrate a future scientific mission," said Klaus Pontoppidan, astronomer and web project scientist at STScI. "These prototypes are expected to be very exciting for astronomers and people alike." Spectroscopy will be generated. The mission team will continue to record data on a list of goals already selected and prioritized by an international committee to implement powerful web capabilities. The production team then receives data from scientists on web science tools and processes it into images for astronomers and the general public.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, the largest and most sophisticated space observatory in partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), is the first full-length image. - will publish its color and spectroscopy data on July 12, 2022 (July 21). Aligns its calibration and mirrors and goes through a total of six months of preparation. This meticulous process, the result of years of new technology development and mission planning, has reached the first images and data: a display of the Web in all its power, ready to embark on a scientific mission and open its eyes to the infrared world.

As we approach the end of the observatory's preparation for scientific exploration, we are on the verge of an incredibly exciting period of discovery about our world. "The release of the first full-color web images will bring unique moments to all of us to marvel at a landscape that humans have never seen before," said NASA web program scientist Eric Smith. "These images will be the culmination of decades of sacrifice, talent and dreaming, but they are just the beginning." Behind the scenes of creating the first web images Deciding what the web should start with Look, it is a project that has been going on for more than five years and has been carried out by an international partnership between NASA, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore as a Web site and mission. "Our goal for the first Web images and data is to show the powerful telescope tools and to demonstrate a future scientific mission," said Klaus Pontoppidan, astronomer and web project scientist at STScI. "These prototypes are expected to be very exciting for astronomers and people alike." Spectroscopy will be generated. The mission team will continue to record data on a list of goals already selected and prioritized by an international committee to implement powerful web capabilities. The production team then receives data from scientists on web science tools and processes it into images for astronomers and the general public.

"I'm proud to be a part of this activity. It usually takes weeks to a month from the telescope's raw data to the final, clean image that tells scientific information about the universe. "

What will we see?

While precise planning for the first full-color images of the web has been going on for a long time, the new telescope is powerful enough to make it difficult to accurately predict what the first images will look like. "Of course we have expectations and hopes, but with a new telescope and this high-resolution infrared data, we do not know exactly until we see the first images," said Joseph DePasquale, lead developer of scientific images at the Space Telescope Institute. We'll see.

The alignment images show the unprecedented sharpness of the web's infrared view. However, these new images, which will be released next month, are the first full-color images and the first images to demonstrate the full scientific capabilities of the web. In addition to these images, the Web will also record spectroscopic data. Accurate information that astronomers can obtain from optical data. The first set of images from material spectroscopy data demonstrates the mission of the mission that inspired the mission and will focus on: the primordial universe, the evolution of galaxies over time, the life cycle of stars, and other worlds. Web startup data prepared during telescope alignment and instrument preparation are also made available to the public.

What's next?

Scientific observations! Once the first images are captured, web-based scientific observations will begin, and this powerful observatory will continue to explore key mission science topics. Various teams from around the world have already applied for what telescopes call the "first cycle," or first year, through a competitive process for telescope time, and observations are carefully planned to make the best use of time. Let the telescope take place.

These observations will be the official start of the Web's general scientific operation, the work it is designed to do. Various astronomers will use the Web to observe the infrared world, analyze the data collected, and publish scientific papers about their discoveries.

Beyond what has already been planned for the Web, there are unexpected discoveries that astronomers cannot make. To predict. An example of this is in the 1990s And that was when the Hubble Space Telescope was launched: dark energy was completely unknown at the time and is now one of the most exciting areas in astrophysics. We have to wait and see which unknowns of the universe the Web will discover. p>

Source: NASA

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *