NASA continues to troubleshoot the Artemis 1 rocket on the launch pad

NASA tried for the second time to launch this key mission on Saturday, September 3rd (12 Shahrivar), but when it failed to diagnose the leak of supercooled liquid hydrogen fuel (LH2) in time, it was prevented from continuing. The launch process was aborted.

NASA tried for the second time to launch this key mission on Saturday, September 3rd (12 Shahrivar), but when it failed to diagnose the leak of supercooled liquid hydrogen fuel (LH2) in time, it was prevented from continuing. The launch process was aborted.

  • The Artemis 1 rocket launch was delayed again due to hydrogen fuel leakage

This A leak occurred in an "instant disconnect" that connects the SLS's center stage to a fuel pipe from the launch tower. After several days of analysis, NASA officials announced that the Artemis 1 team had decided to replace the insulation in this section.

This will be done not in the assembly building, but on Kennedy Space Center's Platform 39B, which houses the The rocket and spacecraft have been in place since three weeks ago.

NASA officials noted in the mission update: "However, performing work on the launch pad requires technicians to create an enclosure around their workplace, protect hardware from weather and other environmental conditions, but also allow engineers to test repairs under cryogenic or ultra-cold conditions.

They added: In-platform troubleshooting also helps gather more data to troubleshoot. However, technical teams may return the rocket to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to carry out additional work that does not require the refrigeration facilities on the launch pad. Technically, it may be necessary to return to the assembly building. The US Space Force has certified the mission's "Flight Termination System" (FTS), which destroys a rocket in the event of a problem during liftoff, for just 25 days.

Issuing a new certificate but requiring retesting of the FTS which can only be done in the assembly building. Although NASA officials may request an extension of the current certification and exemption from retesting, it is not yet clear whether they will do so. Artemis 1 has already received one of these exemptions, and its certificate was extended from 20 days to 25 days.

Saturday's shutdown was the second for Artemis 1. The first, which occurred on August 29 (7 Shahrivar), occurred after measurements showed that one of the engine's four stages did not reach the super-cold temperature suitable for launch.

But the mission team soon realized that A misreading of one of the temperature sensors caused this error, so he decided to try again. An LH2 fuel leak was also detected at the time, but it was much smaller than the one experts are working on now.

The mission has two launches over the next two months. The first one will be from September 19 to October 4 (28 Shahrivar to 12 Mehr) and the second one will be from October 17 to October 31 (25 Mehr to 9 Aban). But if it returns to the assembly building, the launch will not be possible between September 19 and October 19 (September 28 to October 27).> Credit: NASA

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