Light from the early universe passed through the gravitational lens and reached the James Webb telescope

Using gravitational lensing, the James Webb telescope has managed to get a clearer look at one of the objects in the early universe that may be just a fraction of the size of two merging galaxies. show after the big bang.

BingMag.com Light from the early universe passed through the gravitational lens and reached the James Webb telescope

Using gravitational lensing, the James Webb telescope has managed to get a clearer look at one of the objects in the early universe that may be just a fraction of the size of two merging galaxies. show after the big bang.

Whether James Webb is observing two galaxies or two star clusters is not yet clear, but this powerful telescope has succeeded in a dance of dark matter that makes distant cosmic objects better visible. It is possible to observe light from the early universe.

The massive mirror of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) used the gravity of a galaxy cluster to look at a known distant galaxy. But there's one catch: According to new research published on Wednesday, October 26, James Webb may be seeing two galaxies instead of one. The region was previously imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope, but this new view is clearer than ever.

Dan Coe, Space Telescope Science Institute astronomer and Near-Infrared Camera instrument scientist on the web. "We are very much debating whether this mass is a single galaxy or whether it consists of two clusters of stars within the same galaxy," Hezbal said. We don't know anything yet, but these are the questions the web is designed to help answer."

Hubble identified the objects, which were discovered 10 years ago and named MACS0647-JD, as a pale red dot just 400 million years after the Big Bang at the beginning, according to Ko. The world is formed. James Webb, however, specified that this crime actually consists of two crimes. However, the nature of what the telescope sees is still unknown.

BingMag.com Light from the early universe passed through the gravitational lens and reached the James Webb telescope

Hubble and James Webb image comparison of MACS0647-JD

Given that the James Webb Telescope team is committed to publishing the science in progress, this finding is still in the early discussion stage and has not been investigated. Is. If Webb is observing two galaxies, there is an even more interesting possibility: a galactic merger may be taking place in the early universe. Johns Hopkins PhD researcher Yu-Yang Hsiao said, "If this is the farthest merger ever observed, I would be really excited."

But if the web in Whether you're looking at two star clusters or two galaxies, there are clear differences between them: one mass cluster with lots of stars will be slightly bluer, and another with lots of dust will be slightly redder.

Web uses gravitational lensing to Discovering distant parts of the universe is not a new thing in astronomy, but exploiting the ability of massive objects to bend light according to Einstein's general relativity, with the help of the sensitive and powerful instrument of the telescope, will bring a completely new insight to the observation of the universe. The Web is optimized to look in the infrared spectrum at the early universe, which is rapidly moving away from us.

Rebecca Larson, a member of the US National Science Foundation, said in this regard: "Space observations The 20-year-old web will expand the list of early galaxies we know from dozens to many more." He added: "Studying these early galaxies will help us understand how a galaxy like the one we live in today could have formed.

Now scientists are eagerly awaiting more Deep Field images by James Webb. Something Hubble has done many times and will help discover more objects in the early universe.

Cover photo: MACS0647-JD as seen by James Webb
Credit: Science: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, and Tiger Hsiao (Johns Hopkins University) Image Processing: Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

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