The James Webb Telescope captured a magnificent image of the Pillars of Creation

The pillars of creation as one of the most beautiful cosmic landscapes, now with the James Webb space telescope, it has displayed a unique scene of the multitude of stars and space dust. .

BingMag.com The James Webb Telescope captured a magnificent image of the Pillars of Creation

The pillars of creation as one of the most beautiful cosmic landscapes, now with the James Webb space telescope, it has displayed a unique scene of the multitude of stars and space dust. .

The James Webb Space Telescope has just taken another look at one of the most recognizable interstellar objects to get its most detailed picture of the Pillars of Creation, a nursery school. The star maker is in the Eagle Nebula and is approximately 6,500 light-years away.

This near-infrared image shows more detail than the Hubble snapshot taken in 2014. And a multitude of stars, especially baby stars, can be seen in it.

None of the points in this James Webb image are galaxies. In fact, galaxies cannot be seen because the gas and dust of the interstellar medium in the Milky Way obscures the light from more distant objects in such a dense region.

Baby stars are bright red dots and are estimated to be only a few. Be a hundred thousand years old. The red glow of the columns, not to mention the wavy lines at some edges, is the result of jets and bow shock waves that energize the hydrogen gas and expel it.

BingMag.com The James Webb Telescope captured a magnificent image of the Pillars of Creation

Hubble photo of the Pillars of Creation in 1995 (left) and 2014 (right)
Credit: NASA , ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

The Hubble Space Telescope first imaged the pillars of creation in 1995, but With the technology of that time, it showed only a part of the stars in the region.

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Re-imaging in 2014 provided much more detail of the region, but again in the visible light spectrum, the plumes were still almost opaque and some of the forming stars were hidden. James Webb's observations are now, in fact, a more complete representation of activity in this stellar nursery.

BingMag.com The James Webb Telescope captured a magnificent image of the Pillars of Creation

This image The magnificent and advanced data recording isn't just for show, but scientists hope to refine their models of the star formation process thanks to more detailed web data from the region's stars and gas and dust. This, in turn, could improve our understanding of early stellar life and the universe in general.

Cover photo: James Webb's spectacular view of the Pillars of Creation
Credit:NASA, ESA, CSA , STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

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