The James Webb telescope captured incredible detail of the king of the solar system

Looking at Jupiter, the James Webb Space Telescope has captured its unique detail against a background of various galaxies, which has taken scientists hours to analyze the data.

BingMag.com The James Webb telescope captured incredible detail of the king of the solar system

Looking at Jupiter, the James Webb Space Telescope has captured its unique detail against a background of various galaxies, which has taken scientists hours to analyze the data.

There are a lot of events going on at Jupiter with massive storms, powerful winds, auroras and extreme temperature and pressure conditions, and now a new image from the James Webb Space Telescope provides more clues to the adventures inside the planet. provides scientists.

  • Hubble high-quality image of Jupiter's turbulent environment

"Imke de Potter" ( UC Berkeley planetary scientist Imke de Pater, who led the Webb telescope study with Thierry Fouchet of the Paris Observatory, said of the new image: "It's really exciting that we can see the details of Jupiter with We can see rings, small moons and even distant galaxies in one image."

This new image in a collection of It was captured by James Webb's Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and shows the planet's features with three infrared color filters. Due to the invisibility of the infrared spectrum for the human eye, its data has been transferred to the visible light spectrum, so that the longest wavelengths are redder and the shortest wavelengths are more blue. For this image processing, scientists collaborated with citizen-scientist Judy Schmidt.

BingMag.com The James Webb telescope captured incredible detail of the king of the solar system

The yellow and green colors also show the swirling haze around the North and South Poles. And the blue color shows the light reflected from the cloud layers at lower altitudes. The "Great Red Spot" (Great Red Spot), Jupiter's famous and huge storm, with dimensions larger than Earth, is seen in white like other clouds due to the strong reflection of sunlight.

Heidi Hamel ( Heidi Hammel, a scientist at the James Webb Solar System Observatory, said of the magical colors: "The brightness here indicates high altitude, so the Great Red Spot has haze at high altitudes, like in the tropics. "Several bright white spots and streaks are probably high-altitude clouds above dense convective storms." In contrast, the dark bands north of the equator have little cloud cover. James Webb captured Jupiter with its thin rings, which are a million times fainter than the planet itself, along with two small moons, Amalthea and Adrastea.

Fuzzy spots In the lower background of the image, there are probably galaxies that appear in this view. "Our knowledge of Jupiter is summed up in this one image, which shows very well the dynamics and chemistry of Jupiter itself, its rings and its moon system," Fauchet said. have begun to obtain new scientific results about the largest planet in the solar system.

BingMag.com The James Webb telescope captured incredible detail of the king of the solar system

James Webb Space Telescope Wide Field Image of Jupiter
Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Jupiter ERS Team; image processing by Ricardo Hueso (UPV/EHU) and Judy Schmidt

Data from telescopes such as James Webb do not arrive regularly and in a specific set. Instead, the web sends information about the brightness level in different detectors every time. This information is delivered as raw data to the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), the Webb Mission and Science Operations Center.

The institute then processes the data into calibrated files for scientific review and release to the Data Archive. Delivers Mikulski space telescopes. Finally, in their research, scientists convert this information into understandable images, such as this image of Jupiter.

While a special team at the Space Telescope Science Institute is in charge of preparing the official images, usually astronomers Non-professionals also, as citizen-scientists, mine public data from telescopes to process and create images.

Including Judy Schmidt of California, who is a long-time processor in the citizen science community and worked on these new Jupiter views. Even in creating the image of Jupiter's wide field, he collaborated with one of the researchers of these observations, Ricardo Hueso from the University of the Basque Country in Spain.

BingMag.com The James Webb telescope captured incredible detail of the king of the solar system

Judy Schmidt; Citizen-scientist and licensee Minkowski as one of his processed images
Credit: NASA

Schmidt has no formal academic background in astronomy. But 10 years ago, the European Space Agency competition got him interested in astronomical image processing. The Hubble Hidden Treasures contest invited people to find new masterpieces in the Hubble data, and out of nearly 3,000 submitted images, he won third place for an image of a newborn star.

From Schmidt has since worked on data from Hubble and other telescopes as a hobby. "It hooked me and I couldn't let it go," he said. I can spend hours on it every day."

He has so far processed many images of nebulae, globular clusters, star births and other cosmic objects, and the quality of his work has attracted the attention of NASA and various scientists. has done. Including Hummel, who had previously collaborated with him in processing the Hubble images of Comet Shoemaker-Lewi 9 hitting Jupiter. ul>

Jupiter's field is more difficult to work with than the more distant wonders of the universe, Schmidt said, because of its high rate of rotation. Combining different images to create a specific view can be challenging when features on the client have rotated and are no longer aligned during the photo capture. Because of this, digital adjustments are sometimes needed to make the images logically aligned.

James Webb will provide extensive observations about various stages of the universe's history, but if Schmitt had to choose one subject, it would be images of star-forming regions. will be. In particular, he is fascinated by the young stars that shoot powerful jets into small pieces of nebula called Herbig-Harrow objects, and he says he is eager to see these amazing baby stars in the heart of the nebula.

Cover photo : A close-up view of Jupiter as seen by James Webb, processed for the visible spectrum.
Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Jupiter ERS Team; image processing: Judy Schmidt

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.