The James Webb telescope captured the clearest image of Neptune’s rings

The James Webb Space Telescope captured its first image of the planet Neptune, the ice giant of the solar system, and presents a completely new look at this planet.

BingMag.com The James Webb telescope captured the clearest image of Neptune’s rings

The James Webb Space Telescope captured its first image of the planet Neptune, the ice giant of the solar system, and presents a completely new look at this planet.

James Webb's new image provides scientists with the best view of Neptune's icy rings since the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew past Neptune on its way out of the solar system 32 years ago. "It's been three decades since we last saw those faint dust bands, and this is the first time," said Heidi Hammel, a planetary scientist at the Association of Astronomical Research Universities (AURA). which we see in the infrared spectrum."

The Webb Telescope (JWST) in addition to the narrow and bright rings of Neptune that were previously known, shows fainter rings of dust around Neptune that even Voyager 2's close pass of This planet was not revealed in 1989 and scientists had not seen them before. No, the blue color is the characteristic of this planet, which can be seen in the Hubble Space Telescope images of this ice giant. This blue color is caused by methane in the planet's atmosphere and is therefore not visible in the JWST image, which sees the world in the infrared spectrum.

  • The Big Tor Hubble of the outer planets of the solar system

Because methane in the planet's ice clouds strongly absorbs light at these wavelengths, the planet is not covered except in high altitude regions by bright high-altitude clouds. , it looks relatively dark.

Another prominent feature seen in the James Webb image is a cluster of bright spots in its southern hemisphere. These effects indicate ice clouds high in Neptune's atmosphere that reflect sunlight before being absorbed by methane. James Webb's image also shows a continuous high-altitude band of clouds that surrounds Neptune's well-known antarctic cyclone. It is the global circulation of the planet's atmosphere that forms the winds and storms throughout this ice giant.

Another interesting feature can be seen in the north pole of the planet. At this point in Neptune's orbit, which revolves around the Sun every 164 Earth years, its North Pole is almost as far from James Webb's position in space (about 1.5 million kilometers from Earth). However, the powerful Webb Telescope has managed to spot an interesting glow in Neptune's north pole region.

BingMag.com The James Webb telescope captured the clearest image of Neptune’s rings

Neptune and its moons as seen by James Webb
Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

These James Webb images now have a new look It also provides scientists with the seven moons of Neptune. In particular, just above the ice giant in the smaller view of the planet, there is a bright spot that shows the moon Triton.

This is Neptune's moon with a frozen layer of nitrogen. It is densely covered and attracts attention with its very high brightness and reflection of about 70% of sunlight, before Neptune, which is visible due to dark methane. Neptune seems far away, but on a cosmic scale, it is still close to the galaxies and stars billions of light-years away that James Webb is designed to observe.

And even though This telescope was built to observe very distant cosmic objects. Its main purpose is to look at the universe billions of years ago, but it still provides important and fundamental information from inside the solar system.

Photos: James Webb's view of the planet Neptune
Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.