The heart of a phantom galaxy revealed in a spectacular image from the James Webb Telescope

In a new image released by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), the James Webb Space Telescope shows the Phantom Galaxy in stunning detail of the universe. It has revealed a distance of 32 million light years.

BingMag.com The heart of a phantom galaxy revealed in a spectacular image from the James Webb Telescope

In a new image released by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), the James Webb Space Telescope shows the Phantom Galaxy in stunning detail of the universe. It has revealed a distance of 32 million light years.

The infrared technology of the James Webb Space Telescope, which was launched in December 2021 (D 1400), shows more clear details of the Phantom Galaxy than any other telescope.

According to a joint statement from NASA and the European Space Agency, "Webb's sharp vision revealed subtle filaments of gas and dust in the massive spiral arms of the galaxy, which spiral outward from the center of this image."

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Also, the absence of gas in the central region of the Phantom Galaxy has revealed a view of the star cluster located in this region.

This rotating celestial figure, named Messier 74 (M74), is in Pisces is 32 million light years away from Earth. In the web image, glowing white, red, pink and light blue appendages show the galaxy's dust and stars orbiting a bright blue center, all against the dark background of deep space.

BingMag.com The heart of a phantom galaxy revealed in a spectacular image from the James Webb Telescope

M74 had previously been photographed by Hubble, and the veteran space telescope captured the spiraling blue and pink arms of the galaxy, but its bright center

Phantom galaxies are particularly popular targets for astronomers who study the origin and structure of galactic spirals. In this way, the image captured by Webb will help them learn more about the earliest stages of star formation in our local neighborhood in the Universe and provide new information about 19 star-forming galaxies close to the Milky Way.

In a statement, "Astronomers will also use this image to map star-forming regions in galaxies, accurately measure the mass and age of star clusters, and learn about the nature of tiny dust grains moving through interstellar space," the release said.

James Webb, orbiting the Sun at a distance of 1.5 million kilometers at the Lagrangian point 2, has thrilled the scientific community with his crystal clear pictures of the cosmos. This telescope, which has a main mirror with a diameter of more than 6.5 meters, is an international collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency, which is expected to provide scientific data from the cosmos for about 20 years.

Photo: Phantom Galaxy as seen by James Webb

Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, J. Lee and the PHANGS-JWST Team

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