Cosmic lock revealed in new Hubble telescope image

A new image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope of the Reflection Nebula NGC 1999 shows a strange portrait of a swirling cloud of gas and dust that looks like a keyhole. It seems.

BingMag.com Cosmic lock revealed in new Hubble telescope image

A new image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope of the Reflection Nebula NGC 1999 shows a strange portrait of a swirling cloud of gas and dust that looks like a keyhole. It seems.

This nebula is actually the remnant of the formation process of a star called "V380 Orion" which, according to the European Space Agency, can be seen in the center of the image. However, the most prominent feature of this image is not its bright part, but the dark void at the heart of the nebula, which is shaped like a keyhole in a lock.

When this nebula was first observed by Hubble in Imaged in 1999, scientists believed that the dark central region was what is known as a "Bok Globule". They block the passage of light. But after further observations, astronomers realized that the dark region was actually empty space. But the origin of this keyhole-like part is still unclear.

The NGC 1999 nebula is illuminated from the inside by the newborn star V380 Orion, and the nebula itself is actually leftover material from the star formation process. This star with a mass of 3.5 times that of the Sun is seen in white color due to its intense surface heat, which is estimated to be approximately 10,000 degrees Celsius or twice the temperature of the Sun.

This nebula is close to the "Orion Nebula" or "Hunter Nebula", which is 1500 light-years away from us, in the active star-forming region of the Milky Way galaxy. There is milk. According to European and American space agencies, this object is also famous for its proximity to the first discovered Herbig-Haro object. Herbig-Harrow objects are relatively short-lived jets of ionized gas ejected from very young stars.

The new image was produced using archival data from Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, which uses a combination of ultraviolet sensors. It uses visible and near-infrared light to create nebula images. The infrared sensor is one of the most important sensors when looking at nebulae, as Hubble's other sensors cannot see stars inside or behind a nebula that is covered by dust clouds.

This ability to detect infrared spectrum to pass through gas clouds. And dust is what the James Webb Space Telescope is built on. The telescope's infrared camera is much more sensitive than Hubble's and has so far captured stunning images of famous nebulae such as the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula.

Photo: NGC 1999
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, ESO, K. Noll

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