The Artemis 1 rocket passed a key refueling test

NASA's Artemis 1 moon rocket passed a critical refueling test on Wednesday, September 21 (30 September), which is likely to confirm the planned launch on September 27. (October 5).

BingMag.com The Artemis 1 rocket passed a key refueling test

NASA's Artemis 1 moon rocket passed a critical refueling test on Wednesday, September 21 (30 September), which is likely to confirm the planned launch on September 27. (October 5).

The "Artemis 1" mission is supposed to use the giant "Space Launch System" (SLS) rocket to launch the unmanned "Orion" capsule into the orbit of the moon. Send it.

NASA made its second attempt to launch this rocket on September 3 (12 September), but the operation was stopped due to a liquid hydrogen fuel leak in the "quick disconnect" section of the fueling interface of the launch tower to the rocket. In the following days, the mission team replaced the insulation of this sector and planned to test hydrogen refueling. We achieved all the goals we set for this test.

Although this success does not mean that everything went perfectly in this test. For example, again during refueling, hydrogen leakage was seen in the "quick disconnect" section, but this time the experts managed to diagnose it. They heated the section and gave it a chance to repair, which reduced the leak rate to an acceptable level.

Artemis 1 personnel also noticed a distinct hydrogen leak during an initial pressurization test. According to NASA, this second leak was smaller than the other, and the Artemis 1 team was able to keep it under control. and prioritize activities, calibrate and reduce timing risk during the countdown to the launch day." ) is also set as a backup date. According to the officials of this space agency, despite the success of the refueling test, it is still not possible to comment on the certainty of these dates. . I was very happy with today's test and that we passed all our goals."

Some other prerequisites must also be met in order for the Artemis 1 rocket to be able to be launched in the next two weeks. For example, weather conditions must be favorable, which is not a certainty at the Florida Space Coast.

Furthermore, the mission must avoid the re-certification of the Flight Termination System (FTS) required to destroy the SLS. be waived if it deviates from the planned trajectory.

The US Space Force, which oversees the US eastern range for rocket launches, certified Artemis 1 as FTS for 20 days and then with It issued a 25-day extension, which has now expired.

NASA requested an extension, failing which the Space Launch System's massive rocket would have to move from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assembly Building. To be returned.

"Tom Whitmeyer" (Tom Whitmeyer), NASA's deputy director of joint exploration systems development, said referring to the exemption: "Right now, we are still having technical discussions with the regional observers. These discussions have been very productive and positive."

If all goes well with the Artemis 1 mission, the Artemis 2 mission will take astronauts around the moon in 2024, followed by Artemis 3 a year or two later. , will land humans on the moon after several decades.

NASA's goal in the Artemis program is to establish a long-term human presence on the moon and its surroundings, and then use the skills and knowledge gained to travel to Mars in the late It's the 2030s or early 2040s.

Cover photo: Artemis 1 mission rocket on the launch pad
Credit: NASA

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