Everything you need to know about Jungian archetypes or archetypes

Archetypes are universal and inherent patterns of individuals, behaviors, and personalities that play a role in human behavior. "These archetypes are ancient forms of human innate knowledge that have been passed down to us from our ancestors," says Carl Gustav Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist. In Jungian psychology, archetypes represent universal patterns and images that originate in the collective unconscious. Jung believes that archetypes inherit patterns like instinctual activities, and that their patterns of behavior are shaped in this way.

BingMag.com Everything you need to know about Jungian archetypes or archetypes

Archetypes are universal and inherent patterns of individuals, behaviors, and personalities that play a role in human behavior. "These archetypes are ancient forms of human innate knowledge that have been passed down to us from our ancestors," says Carl Gustav Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist. In Jungian psychology, archetypes represent universal patterns and images that originate in the collective unconscious. Jung believes that archetypes inherit patterns like instinctual activities, and that their patterns of behavior are shaped in this way.

The personal unconscious versus the collective unconscious

BingMag.com Everything you need to know about Jungian archetypes or archetypes

The collective unconscious is a unique component that is believed to be Jung acts as a form of psychological inheritance and includes all the knowledge and experiences that humans share as a species. Karl Jung was a follower of Sigmund Freud, but Jung criticized Freud's emphasis on the influence of sexual desire on the process of growth and failure, and therefore developed his psychoanalysis as analytical psychology. Jung, like Freud, agreed with the subconscious role in shaping personality and behavior. He also endorsed Freud's personal unconscious idea and extended it to the point where the concept of the collective unconscious was formed. Jung believed that the human psyche was composed of the following three parts:

  • Self
  • Personal unconscious
  • Collective unconscious

Jung says ego (a set of several basic structures that shape the human personality), Represents the conscious mind; But the subconscious contains memories that are often suppressed.

The root of Jung archetypes

Jung believed that archetypes originated from the collective subconscious and introduced them as inherent, universal, unlearned, and inherited models. Archetypes organize the way we experience specific problems.

Jung believed that the ancient and mythical characters that make up archetypes live with all the people of the world. Archetypes symbolize the basic human motivations, values, and personalities. In The Mental Structure, Jung describes it this way: "All the strongest ideas in history go back to archetypes. This is especially true of religious beliefs, but the basic concepts of science, philosophy, and ethics are no exception. In their present form, there are a variety of archetypal ideas that are created by consciously applying and adapting these ideas to reality. This is the function of consciousness; "Not only is the recognition and absorption of the outside world through the gateway to the senses, but the transformation of the world within us into the visible reality." He rejects the idea that the human mind is a blank slate at birth and is filled only with the experiences it acquires in life, and argues that the human mind preserves the fundamental, unconscious, and biological aspects of our ancestors. This, which Jung calls "primitive images," serves as one of the main pillars of how to be human.

He believed that every archetype played a role in character development, but felt that most people were dominated. They are a special archetype. Jung related the actual way of expressing or realizing an archetype to a number of factors, including one's cultural influences and unique experiences. He identified four main archetypes but believed that there was no limit to the number of archetypes. Jung says that it is not possible to observe these archetypes directly. The Imam can be deduced by looking at the religion, dreams, art and literature of the archetype.

The "persona" archetype is how we present ourselves to the world. The word Persona is derived from a Latin word and literally means "mask". But here persona does not mean a real mask, but all the different social masks we wear in different communities and situations.

The archetype allows people to adapt to the world around them and live in a community. . However, too close a connection with this archetype can cause one to lose sight of one's true self.

Personas play a role in the face of negative images. According to Jung, the persona may appear in dreams or take various forms. During development, children learn and learn specific behaviors to conform to society's expectations and norms. The persona is created as a social mask and includes all the initial motivations and feelings of the person, which are not socially acceptable.

2. The "shadow" archetype

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The shadow is an archetype composed of sexual instincts and life. Shadows form part of the subconscious mind of repressed ideas, weaknesses, desires, instincts and shortcomings has taken. In fact, it casts a shadow over our efforts to conform to cultural norms and expectations.

This archetype is often described as the darker side of the psyche, and represents savagery and chaos. Jung believed that these tendencies are hidden in all of us. People sometimes deny this spiritual element and attribute it to others.

This archetype includes all things that are not acceptable not only to society, but also to one's own morals and personal values, and can include things like jealousy, greed, bigotry, hatred, and aggression. Jung says that shadows can appear in dreams and fantasies and may take many forms; For example, in the form of a snake, monster, demon, dragon or a dark, wild or strange character.

3. The "anima" or "animus" archetype

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And it indicates completion, unity and wholeness.

Anima is a female image in the male psyche and anime is a male image in the female psyche that is associated with the collective subconscious. Jung believed that physiological changes and social influences contributed to the development of sexual patterns and sexual identity, and that the anima and animus archetypes also influenced this process. According to Jung, animus represents the masculine aspect in women and anima represents the feminine aspect in men, which is formed entirely on the basis of what is found in the collective subconscious. Husbands, girlfriends, sisters and mothers are the ones who help to create a more personal image of women. But in many cultures, men and women are forced to take traditional roles seriously. Jung says that men's discouragement to discover feminine aspects, as well as women's frustration with discovering their masculine aspects, weaken a person's psychological development.

4. The "self" archetype is the archetype that represents the individual's subconscious and integrated consciousness. Jung usually has his archetype in a circle. Indicates a square or mandala.

For Jung, the ultimate goal was to achieve a cohesive feeling that in many ways resembled Maslow's concept of self-actualization.

The archetype is formed through a process called individualization, in which different aspects of personality are integrated. Jung believed that the mismatch between the unconscious and the conscious conscience could lead to psychological problems. Incorporating these contradictions into consciousness and applying them to the conscious consciousness is an important part of the process of individuality.

Jung believed that there are two different personality centers: Constitutes, but it is the archetype that is at the center of the personality.

  • Personality encompasses not only consciousness, but also the self and the subconscious mind.
  • Other archetypes

    BingMag.com Everything you need to know about Jungian archetypes or archetypes

    • Ruler/Ruler
    • Creator/Artist
    • Wise
    • Innocent
    • Explorer
    • Rebel
    • Hero
    • Wizard
    • Humor
    • Normal
    • Lover
    • Careful

    Overview

    BingMag.com Everything you need to know about Jungian archetypes or archetypes

    Jung's ideas have never been as popular as Freud's ideas They were not, and archetypes were not considered in modern psychology. The reason for this lack of attention may be the similarity of the name of this type of psychology to different pseudo-sciences and mysticism. This subject is studied more in the field of mythology than as a branch of psychology. Critics of Jung archetypes say they are too stereotypical, reductionist, and culturally biased. Of course, the discussion of Jung archetypes is always hot and debated in psychological circles. If you want to read more about this topic, be sure to refer to the books of Carl Gustav Jung so that you do not fall into the trap of pseudo-sciences and commercial mysticism.

    This article is for educational and informational purposes only. Be sure to consult a specialist before using the recommendations in this article. For more information, read the BingMag Meg Disclaimer .

    Source: Verywellmind

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