What Metal Gear Solid 3 teaches us about hyperrealism

Regarded as the high point of the series, Metal Gear Solid 3: Sneak Eater touches on political and historical themes more than previous issues. What sets this issue apart is that it takes place thirty years earlier than the previous editions, and in that sense it has a freer hand to advance its story, atmosphere and characters. In Sneak Eater, both the method of narration and what is expressed in the story itself are equally important, and such a goal has been implemented by using hyperrealism.

BingMag.com What Metal Gear Solid 3 teaches us about hyperrealism

Regarded as the high point of the series, Metal Gear Solid 3: Sneak Eater touches on political and historical themes more than previous issues. What sets this issue apart is that it takes place thirty years earlier than the previous editions, and in that sense it has a freer hand to advance its story, atmosphere and characters. In Sneak Eater, both the method of narration and what is expressed in the story itself are equally important, and such a goal has been implemented by using hyperrealism.

Hyperreality as a narrative technique, reality and story. combines them in such a way that the border between the two is greatly blurred and the audience cannot easily separate them. This fan is effectively placed in the center and around the whole story of Metal Gear Solid 3 to the point where it can fit pure imagination as an objective historical fact. Hideo Kojima by injecting political, popular, scientific and technological references. Today it is known as the story of Metal Gear. The story of the game is fictional, but it is in the heart of real world events and crises. The traces of such a combination can be found in 1987: when the first Metal Gear narrates its fictional story on a real basis and based on the oil crisis of the seventies.

This is remarkable when we have a story that is contrary to The rest of Metal Gear is in the past and it is unlikely that an audience born in 1964 will have experienced this game. It is not even rude to assume that a large part of the audience of this story are people who do not know much about historical events, especially the long period of the "Cold War".

BingMag.com What Metal Gear Solid 3 teaches us about hyperrealism

Even though Metal Gear Solid 3 is set in the past, it still feels like a product for today's world. In today's information societies where the marketing of this game was done and sold, the majority of these societies were people who were surrounded by images and media information and shaped their worldview. It doesn't matter if this information is via television, cinema, radio, internet or in this particular case, video games. The flow of media and information is sometimes so intense that truth and fiction can no longer be separated. Jean Baudrillard, a postmodern theorist, called this phenomenon "superreality" and wrote in the book "Simulacra and Simulations": "In the postmodern world, the border between fantasy and reality collapses and experience and the basis of reality disappear. will be In fact, it becomes surreal.

These days it is very common to see stories (through mediums such as books, movies, or video games) with some kind of narrative that juxtaposes the actual documentary. In this narrative, history and science are treated like fantasy and science fiction in the same narrative. Many players may say "I'm just watching a fantasy story" when experiencing Metal Gear Solid 3, but few can deny the historical facts that exist in the story; Such as referring to the Cuban missile crisis, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, all of which can be seen as historical data in the form of text, images, and historical videos in the story.

Half of what they told me was a complete and absolute lie... The other half were biased and fabricated lies. So where is the truth? It is hidden in lies. (Eva)

Referring to different types of real events subsequently allowed Kojima to present fictional events as if they were an objective and real event and blend them together. Fictional information in Metal Gear Solid 3 is expressed as historical truth through fictional characters, and these two are intertwined like a coil that any attempt to untangle becomes difficult. It is much easier and more reasonable for the audience to accept the story in its entirety than to deny the information within it.

No wonder the audience is struggling to understand where you stand in this tangled mess. The true story and reference is the Cold War, and where is it imaginary? For example, early in the game, Snake participates in an air and military test as a sample and is compared to Alan Shepard. Even if Alan Shepard's name doesn't have an Arab place here, anyone with a simple internet search can quickly see why Snick is being compared to the first American in space.

A little later, sometime. When Sokolow, a nuclear weapons scientist, talks about the Shegohad mobile nuclear weapon and its dangers to the world, the story refers to another person named Emerson Heinrich (the person who wrote in an article about his concerns about such weapons). Since the story a few minutes ago was comparing a fictional character (Snake) with a real one (Shepard), induction dictates that we think that Sokolo is fictional and Heinrich is real, when both are equally fictional characters. This is another example of meta-reality and the difficulty of separating fantasy from reality

There are countless other examples like this that confirm the assumption of "difficulty separating fantasy from reality". When Major Zero mentions the development of the Sokol rocket at the OKB-754 research center and Yuri Gagarin as the first man to go into space on the Vostok rocket, we see that hyperreality is used in its best form and man, event and technology Fantasy and reality are bundled together in one package, again making it difficult to separate fantasy from reality. The entire text of Metal Gear Solid 3 is highlighted by such comparisons and shows the intensity of the surreal in the story. The vertical take-off and landing that the soldiers ride over the mountains says, the audience may doubt some of the imaginary elements of the story. It takes hours of historical and scholarly research to simply figure out what information from the story is historically valid. This is probably the strongest reason that shows Kojima's skill in creating a postmodern narrative and using hyperreality.

In fact, the use of hyperreality starts even before the experience of the game and the story itself. Along with its instructions on how to control Snake, the Metal Gear Solid 3 manual also devotes three pages to a timeline from 1939 to 1964. This timeline is a clever combination of historical events with in-game events, all of which are important to understanding the plot. This shows that Kojima has tried to create a strong and historical background for his story. Along with information on weapons and related equipment, how to treat wounds, apply essential medical treatments, camouflage, foraging in the wild, and hand-to-hand combat. Therefore, even before the audience wants to play the game, the impression is created in him that the events of the game are supposed to be an accurate picture of how real soldiers survive in such operations.

BingMag.com What Metal Gear Solid 3 teaches us about hyperrealism

What further heightens the surreality in the gameplay are Snike's optional codec conversations with various members of Fox's unit. Some of these interesting conversations take place when talking to the paramedic, and it's no surprise that Kojima paid particular attention to the conversation between these two characters; Because the contacts must always talk to the paramedic first to save the game. He gives Snake information about survival in the jungle with the science of identifying plant and animal species, so the most character Snake talks to is a paramedic.

It's funny how we get caught up in things we know aren't even real. (Paramedic)

But the conversation with the paramedic is not just about saving the game, but it is another creative attempt to use historical references and apply hyper-reality. As an avid movie fan, the paramedic brings reality to the era in which the story takes place, constantly talking about movies of the time. Whether he's talking about film technology in the sixties or describing his favorite movie sequences, he's our main source of information about the Cold War. Much of his explanation is rooted in objective history, but since bits of the surreal are probably in there as well, how is the audience supposed to easily separate those imaginary bits from reality? And again, it becomes difficult to separate fantasy from reality.

More importantly, all the movies that Paramedic references are kind of like Metal Gear Solid 3 itself; For example, the Japanese apocalyptic film "The Last War", which deals with nuclear Armageddon. One can even go further and say that Paramedic's explanation about the value and power of cinema is not only because of his interest, but he wants to say how these imaginary films establish a relationship with the audience and leave an emotional impact on him. He often repeats a sentence and says, "Shut your mind [for a few moments]." This is the goal of all the movies, and it's not just a reference to Snake himself, but a direct message to the audience: stop separating fantasy from reality.

BingMag.com What Metal Gear Solid 3 teaches us about hyperrealism

Despite the heavy focus on hyperreality, Kojima does not abandon postmodern political, economic and social themes in Metal Gear Solid 3. To highlight the tension and complexity of the Cold War, Kojima takes no one's side; Neither the policies of the West nor the policies of the East, nor the social ideologies of the parties. No effort is made to make America or the Soviet Union seem more convincing, and the tension between these two governments makes us questionable. Nowhere do we see democracy being shown as superior or glossing over the hardships usually associated with dictatorial communists. By refusing to surrender to the West and the East, which side is good and which side is evil remains even more ambiguous. America vs the Soviet Union Capitalism vs. Communism. Kojima shows everyone as neutral, that is, everyone is equally valuable and equally worthless. Although Metal Gear Solid 3 doesn't completely turn away from political macro-narratives, it focuses on a more important tension: fantasy versus reality. Fantasy and Reality can be interpreted as an intelligent political critique; Where it is almost impossible for an ordinary person to extract the truth from the covert operations approved and initiated by political leaders and committees. Therefore, the story says that the policies of the Cold War era or even the current time have become so complicated and difficult that it cannot be deciphered independently by a single person, and politics itself in the real world has become more like a meta-reality. So what is told to the people under the title of reality by political parties may be a story, while some events that are ignored by the national governments as stories are reality. This "unknown" and "not knowing" is itself an element of meta-reality.

Just as the espionage operations of special forces in the real world are largely hidden from the public eye, Kojima as a writer can have a lot of freedom in depicting Dragging one of these operations and creating a dynamic plot. After all, espionage, if done right, involves engaging in covert activities that are never intended to be told to the public [so the author's hand is open to imagining such an operation]. Espionage is not unrelated to hyperreality either: both are the result of a struggle to discover the truth in a mountain of different messages that may or may not be true. The spy rises to cover up the reality, manipulate the truth and live on false presuppositions. This is a mirror in front of the face of hyperreality, where fantasy and reality are combined and again, difficult to separate from each other.

This is the component of Kojima's works. Metal Gear Solid 3 asks if games are just a form of entertainment to escape from problems or active forms to engage the audience and say something important? Since Kojima uses hyperreality as a narrative technique to play with the audience's perception, it seems that he considers the second option the answer.

Everything from the characters, the setting, the dialogue and even the new gameplay elements. Like camouflage, they are designed to deceive. As a result, it is very difficult to know what imaginary elements the audience is going to confuse and interpret with reality, and the goal is exactly that they cannot be separated from each other. This is the main evidence for the claim that hyperreality has been skillfully implemented in Metal Gear Solid 3.

Author: Zoran Iovanovici / Source: GameDeveloper

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.