How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

Do you feel shy about using consumable items like health potions and spell casting scrolls? Do you feel anxious when you use a powerful spell scroll to win a tough battle? Do you constantly think that you might need it in a tougher battle in the future, and if you use it now, you'll be stuck later in the game? If your thinking is extreme, you might want to load one of the previous save files and try to win the fight without using said item.

BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

Do you feel shy about using consumable items like health potions and spell casting scrolls? Do you feel anxious when you use a powerful spell scroll to win a tough battle? Do you constantly think that you might need it in a tougher battle in the future, and if you use it now, you'll be stuck later in the game? If your thinking is extreme, you might want to load one of the previous save files and try to win the fight without using said item.

This is a common mindset among those who play role-playing games. they do. This way of thinking makes the interesting mechanisms that the game provides for you to overcome its challenges to be reduced to a series of useless and decorative items in your backpack.

BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

You can't really blame the players for this mentality. What if there really is a fight in the future that is designed to be completely unfair and you have to use a bunch of consumables to win it? Wouldn't it be better to be conservative in this regard?

I must admit at the outset that there is no simple answer to this question. In my opinion, the best solution is for games to remove consumable items from their structure and replace it with a system where your resources are refilled. For example, the Estus Flask in the Dark Souls series is a good example of such a system. Make it believable? Looking at Gothic and Fallout

  • How does Gothic save open-world games from the vortex of repetition?
  • But there are games that use consumable items in an interesting way. Gothic 2 is one of these games.

    In this article I want to talk about the spell scrolls in Gothic 2. These scrolls allow you to cast spells you have not yet learned. Their effect is also different: like turning into a beast, summoning a monster or performing a special and powerful attack.

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2 BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    Spell casting scrolls are very powerful and allow you to complete quests or kill monsters that you wouldn't normally be able to. However, the number of these scrolls in the game is limited. Once you use them, they are gone forever.

    This system seems like a nightmare at first for those who have the problem of "item hoarding". When you know you're not going to get a powerful item back, you'll have no desire to use it.

    But when I experienced the game, I found that the exact opposite happened. There were many situations in the game where I was excited to use my scrolls because the scenario in front of me was worth using the scrolls.

    How did the game achieve this? How did the game developers manage to fix such a pesky problem and make consumable items an engaging part of the game?

    Gothic Scrolls 2 is built around three key concepts that encourage players to use them.

  • The game gives you a lot of rewards for using the scrolls correctly, such as experience, loot and access to new locations.
  • The game gives you a series of under the skin guides to find out on your own. Find out which enemies, missions and areas are worth using scrolls.
  • The game will never punish you for running out of scrolls, because you will always have an alternative way to progress through the game.
  • The first reason: providing a suitable reward for the use of consumable items

    First, let's come to the first reason, i.e. the rewards. , let's pay In Gothic 2, your level and ability number are the two main factors that determine what you can do in the game world.

    There are some players who are better at fighting than others, but in Khorninis - The city where the game is located - Arm strength is more important than skill. This means that leveling up and getting better gear will determine your true power. You can get to this level of power by killing lower-level monsters, but since enemies don't respawn after being killed, you'll have to constantly search the map to find more enemies to kill.

    The faster way to get stronger. To become is to kill stubborn monsters. Trolls, Shadowbeasts, and Demons are all a lot of experience for a player with They bring low level and leave valuable loot that can be sold for better equipment.

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    You have no chance against these creatures in a standard fight. But the scrolls allow you to change the situation in your favor and get the reward from killing these creatures.

    Whenever I used a scroll to kill these creatures, I felt guilty about it at all. I did not find. In other games where the enemies are less powerful, I always question whether or not I need to spend valuable resources to win the fight. However, when you're up against an enemy that can kill you in one hit, there's no question you need a little extra help. The experience and the valuable loot obtained will prove this to you more and more.

    Also, the scrolls allow you to finish some missions much earlier than the intended date. Missions, like monsters, each have their own level of difficulty, and the harder the mission, the better the reward.

    The game expects you to finish the missions in order, but there is no factor to prevent the harder missions. finish early. When we are given more missions, this system helps us to complete them with a more flexible approach.

    There is a mission in the game where you have to find a personal harpooner named Dragomir. . When I was given this mission, I didn't level enough to enter the area where Zubin Dragomir was located, but I managed to complete the mission with the help of a few scrolls.

    The two main enemies that stand in your way There are two Undead Goblins to reach the harpoon. When I reached them, the goblins were too strong for me to defeat. However, I was able to get past them by using a few Destroy Undead scrolls.

    According to some people, using Destroy Undead scrolls on these goblins is the best way to use them. No, but it allowed me to finish the mission early. That's why it was worth it to me.

    Reason 2: Provide guidance on when is the best time to use consumable items

    Provide opportunities for The fact that the player uses consumable items will be meaningful if the player is aware of this issue. Gothic 2 uses many techniques to make these situations vivid. Let me start my analysis with a simple example.

    The bigger an enemy is, the stronger it is. There are not many creatures in the game that are taller than the main character. But those creatures that are bigger are very strong. Trolls, golems, and dragons are all among the toughest enemies in Corinnis. The game also uses their size to its advantage to remind you how powerful they are.

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    In the game, there is a scroll called "Shrink Monster" that emphasizes this more and more. This item greatly reduces the size of a single enemy, making them significantly weaker. Instead of using the phrase "weaken monster", the game developers have used the word "shrink" to emphasize that bigger monsters are stronger. Also, the naming of this scroll gives us an indirect clue: colossal monsters are the best target for this scroll.

    This assumption is correct, as these scrolls are not only an effective way to kill colossal monsters, but also watch the transformation. A troll versus a dwarf troll is very cute.

    Also, Gothic 2 uses its world-building to give you clues about the opportunities ahead. Throughout the Gothic series, the games' stories have always been closely tied to their world design. This narrative coherence lets you know which areas are more challenging and more rewarding.

    Let me give an example of a situation where I personally found a valuable item based on the game's world building. In Gothic 2, you can return to The Valley of Mines - the area where the first game of the series was located. When I first entered the Valley of Mines, there was one area from the first game that I really wanted to visit, and that was the old tower of Xardas.

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    Zardas was one of the strongest characters in Gothic 1, so I knew I could find valuable items and powerful monsters in his tower. When I went there, as I expected, I encountered a lot of enemies (like an evil creature and some skeletons) that he had summoned.

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    Leaving the tower behind was not going to be easy. But I knew that if I could reach the top of it, it would be an item I will find it amazing. So I decided to use a series of scrolls to make my way to the top of the tower. I used the "shrink the monster" scroll on the evil creature and the "destroy the immortal" scroll on a few of the skeletons. I spent a lot of valuable resources to destroy these creatures, but in Zardas room I found an item that made my investment worth it; An item called Master Sword. Even though you only need 60 Dexterity to use this sword, it is very powerful and became my go-to sword for most of the game.

    If I haven't already played Gothic 1 I was and was not familiar with the world building of the game, after encountering Zardas tower I would just mindlessly go there and come back later when I got stronger. But considering that I knew about the history of the tower, I decided to continue the fight and spend valuable resources to conquer the tower. As you can see, my investment paid off.

    World-building is a very valuable tool for guiding the player through the game world, and it works well in the Gothic context, because the gameplay of the game has always been closely linked to its narrative line.

    The final way to provide guidance to the player is through NPC dialogue; Questing characters, new skill trainers, and even ordinary citizens all have a lot to say about the game world, and if you listen to them, you'll hear useful information from them.

    For example, they might warn you about a dangerous area. :

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    "If ahead of this part of the forest Go ahead, you're going to run into some really awkward dudes."

    Or talk excitedly about the treasure ahead:

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    "I just want some gold. Dragons have gold, don't they?

    This information is very reliable, so if a character says that a certain monster is very dangerous, you can accept it as the truth. For example, one of the characters tells you about a monster called the Snorting Dragon Snapper, which is so dangerous that even wolves are not safe from it, and it even beheaded a wolf. When you run into this creature, it will knock you out with one hit.

    These tips are effective on their own, but they work best when combined together. Together, these guidelines create a very cohesive world that is well explained to the player. After wandering around this world for a while, you can almost instinctively know where the big risks and big rewards are. This instinctive understanding allows players to use their scrolls with confidence to reach the rewards they know are waiting for them at the end of the road. he uses his scrolls in them, and these opportunities are pointed out to the player through various hints.

    However, if the game did not punish the players for hoarding the item, none of these methods would work. That's why we come to the third and last reason.

    Third reason: alternative ways should be put in front of the player to advance in each situation.

    To answer these methods, one must ensure that there are no situations in the game where using scrolls is necessary to progress. While scrolls are a welcome part of the game, it's possible to finish Gothic 2 without using them, as the order in which you complete the game's content is flexible, but there's never a moment where it's impossible to progress. Even the toughest enemies can be defeated with a dry sword, albeit with more effort.

    This system allows players to use their consumable items without fear of getting stuck in the game, and feel free to use Fun and creative strategies ensue.

    There was an exception to this rule in Gothic 1, but Piranha Bytes decided to remove it in the second game. In Gothic 1, the "Transform to Meatbug" scroll allowed you to enter tight and small areas. During the main mission it was necessary to use this scroll to access the area you had to enter to advance the story.

    BingMag.com How to stop the player from stockpiling the item? Looking at Gothic 2

    I think the game developers made the right decision by moving away from this style of mission design, as situations like this confuse the player about the correct way to scroll. After you use the turn into a beetle scroll to progress through the story, you may be wondering if there are parts that you need to use the scroll to progress through. This mindset may easily convince you to stockpile the item Bring it.

    But when we move away from this style of mission design, the place of the scrolls in the game structure becomes clearer and more precise. These scrolls exist to provide the player with a large, but unnecessary, power-jump, a power-jump that allows the player to do things beyond their character's current level and power. These scrolls provide a bit of breathing space for the player in a tough game and a brutal world, and allow him to slightly disrupt the standard order of events.

    The reason why scrolls play such an effective role in Gothic 2 is that the creators have understood their function well. For many game developers, the motivation to include a series of powerful consumables in the game is limited to simply making them look cool. In other words, the reason they add these items to the game is because they look "cool" and players expect them to exist in a high fantasy world. But the hard and open Gothic gameplay provides a practical reason for their existence, and the creators have used this system in the best way for the benefit of the game.

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