How does Hades fit into Greek mythology?

Hades (2020) is a roguelike game based on Greek mythology developed and published by Supergiant Games. You play as Zagreus, the son of Hades, who is trying his best to escape from the underworld and join his family on Mount Olympus. The underworld, however, is where the spirits are imprisoned, so Zagreus must fight his way from hall to hall and across his father's realm to reach the land of the living. As a roguelike game, Hades is built around dying and starting over, so expect to die over and over again. Roguelikes can be considered dungeon-based games where dungeons are randomly generated each time and have almost no story. The player is only required to familiarize himself with the dungeon's environment in an endless battle, memorize all its contents, and learn its system (before he dies again and a new dungeon is randomly created). Like its peers, dying and reviving form the central experience of Hades, however, unlike many roguelikes, Hades has focused its gameplay on narrative and story.

BingMag.com How does Hades fit into Greek mythology?

Hades (2020) is a roguelike game based on Greek mythology developed and published by Supergiant Games. You play as Zagreus, the son of Hades, who is trying his best to escape from the underworld and join his family on Mount Olympus. The underworld, however, is where the spirits are imprisoned, so Zagreus must fight his way from hall to hall and across his father's realm to reach the land of the living. As a roguelike game, Hades is built around dying and starting over, so expect to die over and over again. Roguelikes can be considered dungeon-based games where dungeons are randomly generated each time and have almost no story. The player is only required to familiarize himself with the dungeon's environment in an endless battle, memorize all its contents, and learn its system (before he dies again and a new dungeon is randomly created). Like its peers, dying and reviving form the central experience of Hades, however, unlike many roguelikes, Hades has focused its gameplay on narrative and story.

In short, death in Hades itself is an improvement. It is through death that conversations move forward, new characters appear, and even the core plot points are revealed by failing over and over again. Death isn't just a mechanical gameplay tool to remind the player of the consequences of their decisions; Death is a narrative device that Zagreus both experiences and is aware of. According to Greg Kasavin, director and writer of Hades, "If the player always remembers and learns from their deaths, then why not the main character of the game?" Furthermore, Hades' narrative does not end with victory and survival and entering the world of the living because, as the game says after each death, "there is no escape." Zagreus' umbilical cord with the underworld is severed and can only survive in the world of the living for a short time before dying again and returning to its origin. Destiny has condemned him to constantly fight in the underworld and only taste victory for a short moment.

However, the story of Hades is not only about fate. Zagreus' struggle against divine fate represents the limitations and consequences of human decision, and through the endless cycle of death and resurrection, Hades asks us how much fate plays in our lives and how much control we have over it. Hades uses its roguelike structure to imply these themes, that outcomes are irreversible and that in roguelikes the decisions that caused the player's death cannot be redone from the beginning a concept inseparable from the identity of roguelike games. In the sense of destiny and free will, Madakah is one of the constant motifs of Greek tragedies and dramas, just as Hades itself is based on these Greek legends. Hades' use of Greek mythology is not merely decorative and superficial. Many times in history, Greek myths were reconfigured to address contemporary ideas and concerns, and Hades is rooted in such a thing. Examining how Hades uses the power of the roguelike genre to reconfigure Greek mythology shows how video games can use their defining characteristics to revive the cultural power of Greek narratives and provide new insight into the context and aspirations of those who live in these myths. for today's world.

BingMag.com How does Hades fit into Greek mythology?

The word "roguelike" in the literal sense means A game like Rogue. Rogue was created in 1980 by Santa Cruz University students Glen Weichman and Michael Toy. In Rogue, the player travels through a dungeon to find a magical spell, fighting monsters and finding treasures along the way. Rogue was a character-driven game, just the opposite of text-driven adventures like Colossal Cave Adventure, and the dungeons were randomly generated each time and had a perma-mode feature [= after every death the game returns to the first point and there is no checkpoint]. In the following decade, several other open source games inspired by Rogue were created, such as Hack (Jay Fenlason, 1982), Moria (Alan Koeneke, 1983), and Andgband (Astrand and Cutler, 1990). A specific and limited community of developers and fans was formed around these games, so much so that in 1993 a new thread called rec.games.roguelike was created on Usenet to bring these games together and make it easier for fans to talk about Discuss that.

Rogue-like features slowly spilled over into small commercial games during the 90s and 2000s, but the genre itself was a niche genre until around the early 2010s, when it entered mainstream media. and this is due to the increasing popularity of downloadable independent games. It was around this time that a distinction was made between "roguelike" and "roguelight". Roguelites were games that were less punishing and more accessible than their predecessors because of some sort of feature. They have diluted Permadeth. The distinction between the two is interesting in that early definitions of roguelikes did not include many of the features that we know as the basis of the genre today. In Usenet and in the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section that was created about roguelikes, there is no mention at all of perma-mode, random content, and high difficulty as characteristics of the genre.

When at the Roguelike Celebration in Asked in 2016 about the role of Permath in modern roguelikes, Rogue co-director Glenn Weichmann said, "Permath was not built into Rogue to challenge the player's skill in any real way... it wasn't meant to be an eternal, hard defeat at all." Well... what defined the genre at that time was simpler than these words. That you cannot go back and change the decisions that led to death." In an interview with GameSpot, Gregg Kasavin also said something reminiscent of Weichmann's statement: "On the one hand, you might want to create a custom build for the character, but the random and chaotic nature of the game prevents this. This part of the decision-making in roguelikes is very interesting... It's not about the difficulty of the game at all." Under the new definitions, Hades could be defined as a roguelite, but his approach to death follows the same philosophy that Weichmann implemented in Rogue - death is not about "an eternal and hard failure", but rather "you can't make decisions that lead to death." He returned and changed it again. Such a view of death, which forms the core of the roguelike genre, is similar to what Sophocles and Euripides wrote in their treatises on the meaning of destiny, freedom, and human limitations.

These classic authors and the Supergiant team, though Centuries apart, they are reinterpreting a mythological past. By reading the works of Homer and Hesiod, Kasavin noticed a god named Zagreus. Not much information is available about this god, except that he is probably the son of Hades, but it was this lack of information that made him the perfect white paper for the production team to write their story on. "The idea of Zagreus running away after fighting his father, losing, and going back to square one it meshed very neatly with the repetitive structure of roguelikes," Kasavin says. It is no coincidence that the theme of Greek mythology is so well suited to the current formula of roguelikes. The tragedies of Greece and Hades, both of which have Greek mythology as their common source, seem to be in dialogue with each other. In the case of Hades, this theme is evident through the unique systems and structures of the roguelike genre. (Especially in the irreversibility of death and the lack of ability to change past decisions). In Hades, this means choosing to favor one god over another, or choosing a weapon upgrade that changes your playstyle for the rest of the game. These irreversible decisions produce unpredictable results and ultimately lead the player to death or victory.

The purpose of mythology is complex. Humans naturally want to know the world around them and know what their connection is with it, so they create stories and legends for the inexplicable to make it explainable. But the purpose of mythology is not only to provide answers, legends also give an explanation of how today is the result of past events. They include causality and sequence, and in this way, myths reflect the needs, aspirations, and power structures of the societies in which they are created.

Anthropologically, myths are stories that shape the worldview of a culture. , or describes their interpretation and understanding of reality. What we know today as Greek mythology, in its time, was seen not as a myth, but as an idea, with rituals and oral tradition, which was finally written down, reinterpreted, rationalized and used as an allegory for centuries.

BingMag.com How does Hades fit into Greek mythology? They are from our understanding. Death is an inescapable experience, yet what happens after death remains a mystery. The ancient Greeks believed that something leaves the body after death, namely the psyche, and the final destination of the psyche was a realm under the earth - the underworld. The Olympians respected the sanctity of death, and although the underworld gods watched over the dead in the afterlife, they could not control death themselves.

Death is the domain of the Sisters of Fate. The offspring of Nyx and Erebus, children of the ancient Chaos, they hold the lifelines of every mortal being, and even the gods are the instruments of the Sisters of Fate. These sisters don't directly play a big role in Hades' narrative, but the idea of fate does. The sisters are closer to "chaos", that senseless and indifferent expanse that existed before the cosmos, just as Zagreus is destined to fight but never to emerge [forever] from the underworld. The in-game "darkness" entry, a material created in the underworld, in the game's codex It is described as follows: Born of Chaos, the entire underworld is surrounded by pure darkness Those born of darkness must remain in darkness; This is one of the most stable laws of the underworld." The codex entry implies that Zagreus can never truly leave the Underworld. Not because cosmic forces have deliberately conspired against him, but because this is the impenetrable nature of nature. The connection between fate and this abstract force (which is beyond the power of even the gods), as well as the discussion of free will, is a prominent idea in Greek tragedies. The open air theaters of Athens were formed. The ancient religion of the Greeks had no dogma, sacred text or religious class. Writers and thinkers freely wrote about, changed, and reinterpreted old stories without wanting their audience to accept the new interpretations as fact. The old myths on which the tragedies are based assume that man, who struggles in vain, is the handiwork of celestial beings or predestined destinies. Tragedy's focus on human nature, however, invites us to consider how much freedom man has in reaching his destiny, and examines the results of human choice, and the failures and achievements of human freedom. More often than not, characters in Greek tragedies fall into the abyss of their predestined fates, not because of some divine force or intervention, but because they decided so themselveswhat Wachmann, the creator of Rogue, calls the irreversibility of decisions. After all, by the standards of Greek tragedy, what we are to be is unpredictable and uncertain. We can only act according to reason or our most basic need, and hope to be lucky." This is the basic human freedom.

Western literature and its schematic focus on death, fate and free will owes to Greek tragedies and has been a source of inspiration for writers for centuries. According to Lorna Hardwick, professor of classical studies, "myths act like a conduit, oscillating between the boundaries of story, imagination, religious practice, and social mores... that from time to time humans re-invent these myths. interprets it shows that there have been new changes and difficulties in his view of the world [for which the old legends no longer have an answer]." Ancient Greek writers also injected new ideas into familiar legends. Similarly, today we reinterpret ancient myths to reflect modern ideas and concerns. When new media give new colors to new myths, it is as if they are the second author of the same works that they wrote in the past, and a kind of dialogue is established between these old and new authors and their audiences. As a result, the myth emerges from its stagnation and the world can be viewed in a new way with the same familiar mythological past.

So what role does Hades play in these re-interpretations and reconfigurations of Greek myths? The theme of destiny and free will are closely related. If roguelikes are based on dying and starting over, then Premadth is a mechanic that allows players to think more about decisions they've made before, why it killed them, or why it's irreversible. The randomly-generated content means that no two times the game is played the same way, and what is learned can't be undone the second time around, which is why every decision here is critical and should be more focused on. Anne thought.

In Hades, you can't control what happens every time, what powers you get, or what enemies you face. But when you pass a hall you can decide what reward you will get for completing the next hall (this is indicated by the icons above the doors of the new halls). We can choose which way to go, accept or forgo upgrades, spend our money where we see fit, and these decisions ultimately either lead to the player's death or victory. "Ancient Chaos" also offers the player a special power every time, all of which have a negative side effect, but over time they can turn into something very powerful. Not knowing what lies ahead, the player must weigh the pros and cons of whatever force he's about to take in the next hall. Will removing this power be fatal, ending the current game, or will its benefits eventually become apparent and help overcome an obstacle we are currently unaware of? Perhaps God of Chaos' forgiveness by giving this power has the downside that the player takes more damage in combat, and has to spend more money each time on health items rather than upgrading powers. To what extent is failure in Hades the result of the random nature of the game, and how much is the result of the player's own decisions?

BingMag.com How does Hades fit into Greek mythology?

Kaleshaghi Zagreus gives him the strength to fight again and again to escape from the underworld, and it is because of this Keleshaghi that he finally understands He can never escape from his father's domain. Despite knowing this, he continues to fight against his destiny. Finally, we understand that Zagreus' purpose to join the gods of Olympus is a conspiracy; He is actually looking for his mother Persephone, whom he has lost for years. Zagreus left his mother's body dead, and although the goddess Nyx gave him life, it was too late, and Persephone had already left the underworld with all her sorrow. Zagreus wants to rejoin him, to get his answers, but they, who are from the underworld, are "born of darkness and must remain in darkness." Accepting that he is, Zagreus, with persistence, applies his free will within the framework of the destiny he is enclosed in, in order to reach a more desirable result. This is one of the types of freedom that Greek tragedians believed in: We are not free to escape fate; But at least we are free enough, knowing the consequences, to go to the heart of it with strength and not with compromise." And that's exactly what Zagreus does. He never escapes from the underworld, and it won't take him long to die again in the world of the living, but in the same short time he can convince Persephone to return to the house of Hades and all the family will be together. This is how Zagreus earns his father's respect and is officially accepted by him to continue fighting in the Underworld again to discover its security holes.

Zagerus must continue to escape from the Underworld because otherwise Literally, the ability to play Hades is lost. But the continuation of the struggle of Zagreus is the same struggle that we see every day in our daily life. Just as Zagreus is intrinsically connected to the underworld, and just as everything he sees in every hand is random, there are things in our lives over which we have no controlpandemics, elections, job uncertaintybut we can at least accept these conditions. And we are free to exercise our will on the decisions before us, to shape the world in a more desirable way.

About the Author: Jacob Hamill is an amateur blogger who has not yet officially enrolled in college and a background in history. It has archeology and cultural anthropology. He is interested in how these subjects intertwine with art and entertainment and is currently trying to learn the Chinese game of mahjong on his own.

BingMag.com How does Hades fit into Greek mythology?

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