Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

In the "Hot Pick" content series, we are going to share a series from the words of Yahtzee Croshaw, one of the most knowledgeable and experienced critics and satirists in the game field. Let's take a controversial view of the current state of the game industry and see if there is a problem in the game industry, where its roots go back to. Stay with us.

BingMag.com Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

In the "Hot Pick" content series, we are going to share a series from the words of Yahtzee Croshaw, one of the most knowledgeable and experienced critics and satirists in the game field. Let's take a controversial view of the current state of the game industry and see if there is a problem in the game industry, where its roots go back to. Stay with us.

If there is no interference in the editing process of this article, the headline should be: Where did the synth series go wrong? (Where Saints Row Went Wrong). According to the custom of all fake and click-bait content, before I answer the question in the title, I will spend five minutes talking about all the details related to it. Because first of all I want to explain where the synth went wrong. The synth was going really well. It can be said that it was going well for a longer period of time than other collections. It is only the new synth that has raised the bar and received negative reviews. So let me list all the right things this series was doing.

#1: Synth swam in the opposite direction of GTA

There is much debate as to who invented the concept of sandbox gameplay. From the very first days of gaming history, games like Elite and Ultima allowed the player to do whatever he wanted. But I think GTA was the first "revolutionary" sandbox game. The focus of the game was to create a beautifully realistic city full of interconnected systems and active NPCs, allowing you to run the basic gameplay through this bustling city, leaving a trail of corpses and explosions behind you. Also, the atmosphere and story of the game was exaggerated and playful and had the right proportion with its content. This trend continued until the first wave of 3D GTA games - GTA 3, Vice City and San Andreas - but after GTA 4 the series changed.

BingMag.com Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

From San Andreas and its story, which was about themes such as the dissatisfaction of young people of color with the state of America, it was clear that this series is moving towards becoming more serious. But GTA 4 was a perfect product of the depressing realism of its time. Of course, this game also had playful aspects, such as the names of shops and stores that were all stupid and vulgar puns, but the story of the game was full of heavy themes and emotional characters, and it had a new realistic physics engine. It was already clear that the focus of the experience that the game wanted to provide was not to run over the nation in a car and have fun.

Synthes at the time of its release alongside games such as True Crime: The Streets of Los Angeles (True Crime: Streets of LA) and The Getaway were considered GTA clones, but their creators were smart enough to realize that the trend of the series towards realism left a gap after GTA 4. This void also belonged to crime-style sandbox games that weren't supposed to take themselves too seriously. Synth Row 2 was exactly such a game. Playing the ridiculous leader of a criminal gang that took over a city and threw liquid poo at people's houses wasn't realistic at all, but it was a lot more fun than taking your fat cousin bowling.

BingMag.com Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

Note that I am not reviewing GTA 4. I love this game. In fact, I think it should be valued more. This game is very immersive and has a high quality of writing and Nico Blake is one of my favorite main characters in the game world, but sometimes we want to laugh and think about heavy themes, sometimes we also want to poop. Let's sprinkle the house of a servant of God. It is necessary to meet both needs, and the Synth was able to meet the second need very well. It allows you to determine even the angle of the bridge of the nose and the empty space under the eyebrow of the character you are creating, but in synthesis, this system has a different quality. Every time I play one of the Synth Row games, I reproduce the same character. He's a pale, skinny youngster with fawn hair and crazy staring eyes, and every time I open the options in the costume shop, I always dress him up like Batman's villain, the Riddler: i.e., a colorful jumpsuit and matching hat. . It should be noted that he speaks with a Cockney accent. In my mind, his name is Spider. I was recently playing Synth Row 4 from scratch and my wife - who also loves Synths - watched Spider rampage around town for a while and then remarked that How strange to see the wrong main character in these games.

BingMag.com Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

Because he does the same thing. He also has his own main character and always plays his role in Synths games. Most of the people I've talked to about the game have the same personality. Synth Row does something that makes us feel more attached to our in-game avatar than in other games. As a comparison, consider the Dark Souls series of games: in these games, as soon as our character puts on his hat, we forget what he looked like. It is very high, but unlike the characters made in other games, it is not a hollow mold. Your main character has his own personality, and part of this character is conveyed in the form of his appearance and voice acting, which is under our control, and the other part is conveyed through his dialogues and actions in the cutscenes of the game, which is not under our control. This reminds me of what I said about interactive storytelling: it works best when it feels like the player and the author are working together. So when the boss of the synths does something really coollike jump out of a falling plane and jump back in again, or trick Michael Dornthe game's voice actorinto killing his girlfriendour brain tells us: "We participated in the occurrence of this incident. "The character we created is doing these things in the game." In this mode, you get the feeling of a parent watching their child's great performance in the school theater.

Number 3: Always getting crazier

If you present yourself or your product as a ridiculous, grandiose phenomenon, you're kind of in trouble because you have to keep that level of energy up until the end of the line. You have to get progressively more ridiculous and grandiose. Because each new zoom sets a new expectation level that cannot be lowered. If the beat stagnates, it's like people not laughing at a comedian's jokes at a stand-up show. Suddenly, the environment becomes silent and disturbing, and everyone wonders why no one takes the microphone from this old guy.

For example, this is one of the problems of the Borderlands series. This series also seeks to create a ridiculous and crazy atmosphere, but the whole gameplay is based on going through similar shootings and stopping after each one to loot the corpses of enemies to get better equipment. In the meantime, an annoying character constantly utters dialogues in your ear that, in the style of Joss Whdon's works, indicate a misunderstanding of the concept of intelligence.

But Sintz Rowe managed to keep the energy level high. Synth Row has become known as a collection that always knows how to create the craziest scenarios. As each sequel was released, the frenzy entered a new level. In Synth Row 3, members of Synths from the leaders of criminal gangs become international celebrities whose job it is to fight against supervillains and zombies. In Synth Row 4 you are the president and you have to fight against space aliens. This was the only level of insanity the series could go to. Like Super Mario, this collection changed the scale from Earth to the world and then to the galaxy.

BingMag.com Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

The problem is that at this level of insanity, it had to end. As the makers of the Friday the 13th horror franchise learned, there's no worse scenario than going into space. If the developers had made Synth Row 5 more about space adventures, this game would have been boring because the madness of the series would not have reached a new level. As the saying goes, space is the last frontier (referring to the famous slogan of the Star Trek series). It's true that space adds endless potential for storytelling to your plot, but the problem is, ironically, you have no room to grow from there. After Synth Row 4, it was impossible to make a game that didn't look like a step backwards or a symbol of the collection's declining energy. For a series that had established its identity on the basis of becoming more and more crazy, this issue not only disappointed the audience, but in a way indicated the destruction of the series' identity.

BingMag.com Hot Take: Where Did the Saints Row Series Go Wrong?

Another issue was that Synth Row 4 was practically making fun of itself and the previous games in the series. This is a privilege that only the last title of a series has. It's like when you were allowed to bring a game on the last day of school. That's why it was very difficult to make a sequel for Sins Row 4. You can't take off your hat to show everyone that a hamster running on a wheel is determining your brain energy, and then put your hat on and pretend there's no hamster.

Oh my god. What do I have? I say.

Alright, now we get to the hot take that the clicker title of the article promised: Where did the synth go wrong? The main problem with the new synthesis is that it exists. But other than that, unpleasant characters, disjointed story, pointless narrative and lack of any innovation in the gameplay were all nails in the coffin of the game, but even if these problems did not exist, the game would still be in an awkward position. Firstly because of the existence, secondly because there is no English option for the main character to speak with a cockney accent. Happy soul, Spider. We didn't get to know you well. Hoping that in that world you will be sprinkling liquid feces in the face of the devil.

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