20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Develop:Brighton is the only event in the UK that brings together the entire games industry. From world-renowned directors to members of small game studios, this event gathers to learn from each other, share ideas and experiences, and do business in a friendly environment. This event has been held since 2006. It is interesting to know that this year's event broke the record with the attendance of 3473 game makers during three days.

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Develop:Brighton is the only event in the UK that brings together the entire games industry. From world-renowned directors to members of small game studios, this event gathers to learn from each other, share ideas and experiences, and do business in a friendly environment. This event has been held since 2006. It is interesting to know that this year's event broke the record with the attendance of 3473 game makers during three days.

Now, on the occasion of its 20th anniversary, GamesIndustry.biz media has invited a group of prominent developers who have participated in this event. to share the most important lessons they have learned over the past two decades. These lessons are vital not only for those who want to work in this industry and make their favorite game, but also for anyone who wants to improve.

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Don't Think You Know Everything

Dinga Bakaba, Creative Director of Arkin Studio (Lyon Branch)

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Learn as much as you can from your colleagues. Sometimes young developers think they've discovered a new approach. On the other hand, senior developers think that they know everything and don't have to learn anything from students and people who have just joined the industry.

It doesn't matter at what stage of the career. Be yourself, consider interacting with colleagues. Talk to them and listen to them. I've learned more from talking to experienced and new developers than from attending any conference. So don't think you know everything.

Build the best team and then be the dumbest member

Warren Spector, chief creative officer of the studio OtherSide Entertainment

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Build the best team you can. Of course, a team of the best people you can find, not the best people in the industry. Make sure members have a clear vision and the right metrics for success. For some, making money or becoming famous is important, and for others, success is creating a work that people are still talking about 20 years later.

With a team perspective and the right criteria To succeed, be the dumbest person on the team and let the team members be creative. As long as they don't stray from the team's primary goal, they can create a better effect than you think. This is the single most important measure of success I've ever experienced.

Resolve Member Recruiting Problems and Issues ASAP

Brenda Romero, CEO & Game Director, Romero Studios Games

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Even if a top publisher hires you all the people you want, always have a secondary checklist of why not. He hired the person or why this transaction should not be done. The point is not to insult or take the person mentioned too seriously, but to think of reasons why they are not a good fit for your team. For example, a person likes to be a dictator if he can manage a team.

So people like this are the ones who might get you in trouble. Therefore, it is better to examine the reasons for hiring people well and try to eradicate the problems related to hiring people as soon as possible.

Make a game for yourself

Sam Barlow, owner and director of Half Mermaid Studio

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developersThe relationship between the game and the player is one-on-one and very intimate. So making a very specific game is somehow more casual than making a novel or a movie. For me, the only way to make a video game is to listen to myself and make something that directly follows my curiosities and desires. That game is really satisfying and fun for them. The only way to create something that engages your audience's mind is to create something very special and personal. Think about a game you'd like to play but doesn't exist and create it.

Creative people shouldn't be afraid to be a manager

Caroline Marchal ), CEO and Creative Director of Interior Night Studio

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

I didn't want to be a CEO but I did it because I had to. I ended up doing a lot of things that creative people rarely do and probably made a lot of mistakes, but I'm still standing. Now I don't give up my chair as a manager to anyone even if it's stressful for me because being a CEO gives you The title of a creative person empowers and allows you to take your studio and game in any direction you want.

It is very motivating and gives stability to the team. I am incredibly proud to have built this team of lovely and talented people. That's why I think it's worth it to be a manager.

It's easier than you think

Aaryn Flynn, CEO of Inflexion Games and Director Former Bioware executive

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Things are often easier than you think. I know this goes against the famous phrase "talking is easy but action is hard" which is usually associated with when someone is too ambitious or inexperienced, however we as developers today have great tools that we can use to solve our problems. solve with them through early versions of games.

Many times we think to ourselves that everything seems too hard and we should talk more about something. Get more information, but decision-making is related to information, not time. A lot of times an early playable version gives us the information we need to make a decision. This is a lesson I've learned the hard way throughout my working life.

Don't stray from the industry

Rami Ismail, Freelance Developer

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

If you want to do something cool or change an industry, if you're in the minority or whatever, one of the best things you can do is To have the courage to just stay in the industry and not walk away from it. As an industry, I think we've gotten better over time at helping good, talented people stay in the industry, but there's still a lot of work to be done. Although there are talks like hard working conditions, mental and physical health of game makers and sidelines nowadays, but in the end everyone says that we want good people to stay in this industry.

As an Arab man who grew up in the Netherlands And never felt like there was anyone to look up to or even speak her language, one of the best things we can do in the industry is to empower people like me to stand up for their cause. And still be a part of this industry. Don't let anyone do anything that hurts your ability to stay in this field. Not everyone can do this. Of course, there's no shame in wanting to get out of the industry, because it can be an awful place for you. However, being able to help keep good and talented people is probably the best lesson I've learned in this industry.

Keep your IP, don't be afraid to fail and know your role

Ian Livingstone, industry veteran

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

There are three main things I want to focus on. I focus on it. The first is intellectual property and the value of an IP. Having intellectual property is essential for any company and many times more value is created through that IP. Too often, I've seen an IP traded to fund another project. Protect your IP as much as you can.

Second, don't be afraid to fail. Failure in the game development process helps you succeed, but there are many ways you can prevent your failure, and one of them is investment. Investing allows you to pitch your project with the right people, gives you enough cash to fulfill your ambitions, and also ensures you don't lose your IPs.

Last The case is to manage the tasks of team members. There's no reason for a creative director to be thinking of toilet paper for the studio or doing fundraising when that can be done by a finance director. Accordingly, there is no reason, and you should never let CFOs decide how a project should be done because they tend to build something that was popular last year, even though their desired style may be Don't be afraid to fire people to protect your team next year.

Don't be afraid to fire people to protect your team

Allan Cudicio, founder and creative director of Twin Drums Studio

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

I want to go back to my experiences; Back when I was just starting out in this industry and in the early days I heard a lot of insults as a black person. I have literally experienced this and HR did nothing at the time. I remember swearing at one point that whenever I became a manager, I would never let that happen to anyone, and I did.

Firing isn't always a bad thing. I am in favor of labor laws and employee protection, and you should not fire someone for no reason. You can teach him and teach him, but if it doesn't work and the red line is crossed fired him. Protect your team, the weak, the introverts, and the minorities. I've been made strong by experiences I don't want anyone to go through, so I fire people sometimes, and so should you.

Passion, People, and Perseverance

Chella Ramanan, author and founder of 3-Fold Games studio

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

My three lessons passion, people and perseverance Is. The first is passion. Find something you love about games and something you want to add to games in some way. It could be the way they are made or the innovations you are interested in.

Once you find something that motivates you and moves you, find people who inspire you. They are you and they support you and even challenge you because they are the ones who help you when you face problems. Making games is hard work, and you need those people to push you.

Finally, persistence is important, because like I said, the process of making games is by no means easy. You need that persistence, that passion, and those people for those moments when you lose all hope, when things seem too difficult, or when someone says your idea is bullshit. Either way, if you're passionate about something, it's definitely worth pursuing and finishing.

The industry needs cultural ambassadors

Gina Jackson, founder of GameDev Bootcamps

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

My advice to developers, publishers and everyone working in the industry is to find stories and people. They can be our cultural ambassadors. In fact, we should not shy away from discussion or bias about what we do and how we do it. Imagine being in a society where politicians are as happy to talk about the games they play or to be with a game developer or e-sports star as they are to meet a movie or TV star.

Imagine telling someone you just met about what you're doing and they don't apologetically say they're not into the gaming experience. We are very focused on what we offer as an industry. Everyone knows that our industry earns more than television and cinema, but do we have more cultural influence than them?

Make what you love

Shahid Ahmed, director of Crescent Code Studio

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

If you love what you do, you will do it and not ask for permission. Love should drive you to create what you want to create. I asked a lot of people on Twitter, I asked publishers, friends, developers, audience, etc. But they don't know what they want. Few people can say what they want.

That's your job. Only you can create what you love. So produce what you want and make it yours without delay. Finally, put all your love and passion into it.

Don't rush to hire people

Aj Grand-Scrutton, CEO of Dlala Studios

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Nothing is more important than the people you work with and the people you hire. In fact, it is important to hire correctly, not to hire quickly. When you have gaps in your team and projects, it's easy to try to fill those gaps as quickly as possible, but it's important to find the right people to fit those gaps. You need to bring in someone who not only has the right skills, but also complements the rest of the team.

Of course, this does not mean finding the same personalities, attitudes and tastes. This means that whoever you bring into the studio should engage your team in a positive way. You shouldn't hire someone who causes discomfort on your team.

There is no such thing as a shortcut

Stephane D'Astous, former founder of Eidos Montreal

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Don't believe in shortcuts and do your own thing. This may sound very simple and basic, but if you believe in these two things, you will save a lot of time and reduce a lot of extra work and frustration. When I say don't believe in shortcuts, I don't mean there aren't any creative ways to finish a project, but great shortcuts never exist. The road to success is not short and it must be reached smartly and with a lot of teamwork.

You must be brave and discover all the obstacles that are in your way. You have to answer the questions you don't know. The simple fact of knowing the risks of the project itself is a good start, so you should ask yourself a lot of hard questions. From your safe zone Get out, because it will make you stop improvising because you will have trouble in business. In general, when you're not prepared for something and you didn't anticipate it, that's when you fail.

The Power of Empathy

Cinzia Musio, Business Consultant

h3> BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

The thing about empathy is that we think empathy is something you either have or you don't, but it's actually It's a skill you can work on, and like any other skill you acquire, the more you work at it, the better you get at it. To do this, start talking to people around you, listen to their stories and look at what they do and their life process. We give, make it better, but with empathy you can make sure that the people around you stay by your side. On the other hand, with it you can keep the right people and fire the people who don't suit you.

Be different

Sitara Shefta , Head of No Brakes Games Studios

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

Just because something might be an industry standard doesn't mean it's actually the best way It is for you or your team. We all have a lot of creativity in making games and sometimes we need more creativity in different processes. When we first started working on the current projects, we adopted a rapid development process. However, about a year later, we were failing and it didn't feel good. Eventually, we realized that we were too constrained by time constraints or deadlines.

So we moved to another method of development that was used by many other software companies, but the problem with this method was that It was becoming very difficult to step back and look at the game as a whole product. So we turned to our current hybrid approach. Sometimes it's better to let go of norms, because it helps to increase the quality of the project and the morale of the team.

Respect your audience

Noirin Carmody, Business Director at Revolution Software

BingMag.com 20 important game making lessons from famous game industry developers

When he shared a new image of George in Broken Sword with his supporters We shared on Kickstarter, they said he didn't look cool. So we changed it. Although the designers were not very happy with this, we did it and the supporters were very happy with it. They felt that they were a part of the project, which of course was mostly because they provided part of the project's budget. In any case, they felt satisfied that we listened to them.

Another promise we made was to give them a disc without digital rights management (DRM) technologies. Our publisher couldn't deliver it, so the audience was upset. We had to work with a production company that could deliver DRM-free discs to players, which was actually very difficult. We ended up sending the discs to the people who requested them, and not only were they happy, but they posted about how we got in touch with them. So my big lesson is to respect your audience and engage with them. Finally, let them criticize you.

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