What is the story behind the pictures on the cover of Time magazine?

Time magazine is an important publication and its cover photo always conveys important words and messages to the world. If you like to read magazines, search in English, you will find these publications here and there. Time is one of those publications whose words and articles are important and decisive. In this interview that a website called "fipp" conducted with Time magazine cover designer D.W. Pine, we learn about the story behind a photo or photo on the covers of Time magazine; How and with what philosophy it is formed.

BingMag.com What is the story behind the pictures on the cover of Time magazine?

Time magazine is an important publication and its cover photo always conveys important words and messages to the world. If you like to read magazines, search in English, you will find these publications here and there. Time is one of those publications whose words and articles are important and decisive. In this interview that a website called "fipp" conducted with Time magazine cover designer D.W. Pine, we learn about the story behind a photo or photo on the covers of Time magazine; How and with what philosophy it is formed.

1. What message do you want to convey through the cover images of Time magazine?

The cover of Time magazine presents important issues in a simple, graphic and effective format in dimensions of eight by ten inches, and this in a time It is a powerful tool to receive all the visual information in one moment and forget it tomorrow. The cover of Time magazine, with its distinctive red frame, can make the chaotic landscape of the media comprehensible, attract people's attention and make them think. This is the power of time.

2. How does cover design examine the world's most complex issues?

Even with the increasingly dramatic competition for people's attention, the cover of Time magazine is still as relevant as it was ninety-five years ago; Given the wave of mistrust in the news right now, perhaps this image is even more apt. We live in a very complex world with few simple answers. For me, a picture (be it a photo or an illustration) goes beyond the saying "a picture is worth a thousand words". It is something more than that. It has the power to disrupt the chaos of tweets and 24-hour news and competing voices.

3. Are sentences and texts on the cover necessary? Can a cover tell a story without the help of words?

Cover sentences aren't always necessary, but they can definitely enhance its visual appeal. For a cover on Russia's influence on the White House (in May 2017), we concluded that the image of the Kremlin taking over the White House was strong enough on its own. Most people now see Time covers digitally, so I had to adjust the typography and put more emphasis on simplicity. We try to create more than one poster every week.

4. What stories or messages do the covers of Time magazine convey? What do you think have been the biggest issues?

For example, in 2018 we certainly tried to cover the Trump administration (examining his foreign policy decisions and ever-increasing investigations), but this year we focused on topics such as increased shootings and Violence in America (with a full-screen shot of over 240 people that J.R. produced during a gun negotiation), aerial photography technology (with a display of about a thousand drones flying in the sky and our frame and logo were forming), and we've covered Brett Kavanagh's permanent Supreme Court nomination (with a graphic portrait of Christian Bliss Ford framed by his powerful words of testimony); In addition to the Middle East elections, the royal wedding and more than forty news and other topics, these topics shaped the year 2018.

5. Is choosing a cover image hard or challenging? Who chooses it? Who makes the final decision?

Creating Time's cover image each week is clearly the result of a group effort. About six of us meet in my office and brainstorm ideas for cover stories and images, sometimes taking hours. Most weeks I try several different approaches. At the end of the week (usually Wednesdays), the editor decides which picture will be on the cover of Time magazine.

6. How do you choose between a photo, portrait, image or illustration (or aerial imagery)? What tells a story best?

What I've always loved about Time is that we're allowed to cover a wide range of topics; From health to politics, business, sports, science and world news; And our readers expect us to address these issues. We are equally diverse in the way we visually represent a subject. Some weeks it's a portrait in a certain style, and other weeks it's a graphic illustration. Sometimes it's only text, and sometimes it's a news video or painting or aerial images. Our visual approach depends heavily on the theme or idea we want to convey, and this theme changes every week.

7. How do these covers become so iconic? How do they win awards and provoke thought?

The cover of Time has been said to be the most important property in journalism. What goes into this red frame every week is something our readers need to know, and every A personal decision is made with a lot of care and responsibility. Over the past ninety-five years, Time's covers have been provocative and controversial, often leading to national conversations, whether about parenting, technology, health, or politics.

8. What are your favorite covers in Time magazine? Why?

It is very difficult to choose just one; Each of them has their own story to tell. I have put only one of the covers of Time on the wall of my house; A cover from the 1950s about Coca-Cola, by an artist named Boris Artzibashev, who designed more than two hundred covers for Time magazine from the 1940s to the 1960s. This imagery is a little weird, and being born in Atlanta, I grew up on Coca-Cola. But this image in the first stage reminds me of the great illustrators who worked on the covers of Time magazine.

9. What makes Time's arts department such an exciting yet challenging place to work on a daily basis?

Not only do I get to work alongside some of the smartest journalists, but some of the best illustrators and I also recruit photographers from around the world, who want to show their work and help us fill this empty canvas every week. This is a rare and exciting combination.

10. Is a magazine cover still powerful? What do covers mean today? Do you think covers are still valuable on newsstands or in today's multi-platform environment?

Time Magazine's cover design mission is to create a clear and detailed image, yet simple; So we also consider those who buy magazines from kiosks. The fact that we print magazines and work so hard to create them is a very valuable tool for people. If we had produced the magazine only online, it would not have been as attractive or less effective. Fortunately, we don't have to choose. We print more than three million copies worldwide every week, across multiple platforms, and for the last four years we've animated magazine covers for our more than forty-six million online followers. We have certainly been able to introduce Time to a completely new audience.

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