8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

Only the most talented writers in the world can describe food on paper in such a way that it becomes memorable, that makes the reader hungry. References to food in literature are often either symbolic or functional. Food can represent social status or environment, or it can help advance the story. Even in the hands of the best writers, food-centered scenes are not very important to the story and are considered secondary and time-filling scenes. Although there are exceptions; Moments in which food opens up a higher form of story to the audience. And food is important for us Iranians. We have no problem with describing the food on paper and showing the food on the picture. Just scroll through your memories to see the importance and high status of food and dining customs in Iranian culture. Here we review eight memorable descriptions of food in world literature selected by one of the writers of the Atlantic magazine.

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

Only the most talented writers in the world can describe food on paper in such a way that it becomes memorable, that makes the reader hungry. References to food in literature are often either symbolic or functional. Food can represent social status or environment, or it can help advance the story. Even in the hands of the best writers, food-centered scenes are not very important to the story and are considered secondary and time-filling scenes. Although there are exceptions; Moments in which food opens up a higher form of story to the audience. And food is important for us Iranians. We have no problem with describing the food on paper and showing the food on the picture. Just scroll through your memories to see the importance and high status of food and dining customs in Iranian culture. Here we review eight memorable descriptions of food in world literature selected by one of the writers of the Atlantic magazine.

1. The novel "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" by Haruki Murakami

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

In addition to having one of the best beginnings of any novel, "The History of the Cookie Bird" also contains some of the most memorable meals in all of literature. In a surreal novel full of darkness and confusing scenes, Murakami's simple descriptions of food have a lasting quality; It's the only thing that keeps the story close to reality when it strays from its main character, Toru; And at the same time, it prepares the space for revealing a strange mystery:

"At noon I had lunch and went to the supermarket. I bought food for dinner there, and picked up sanitizer, paper towels, and toilet paper from the auction section. At home, I prepared dinner and lay on the sofa with a book, waiting for Kumiko to come home... I didn't have a fancy dinner in mind: I wanted small pieces of meat, onions, green peppers and bean sprouts with a little salt, pepper and fry soy sauce; The recipe I remembered from when I was single. The rice was ready, the miso soup was warm, and the vegetables were all chopped and arranged in separate batches in a large dish, ready to be cooked in the pan. These descriptions are nerve-wracking and make the audience's mouth water every time. Pay attention to the simplicity of the food, its methodical preparation, the sense of time and anticipation of the characters. Murakami's descriptions of food are exactly like his novels; They take the mundane and give it a magical feel, they take reality and cover it with dream.

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2. The short story "Under the Jaguar Sun" by Italo Calvino

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

Calvino's special skill is his visionary eye; It can create very light stories from a super complex world. In "Under the Jaguar Sun," a collection of three short stories that engage the senses, he describes cooking as "a complex and subtle transmission of knowledge." Every food can reflect a story of the person who eats it; A story that connects food to its ancestors. (Anyone who has attempted to decipher his grandmother's handwritten Italian recipes will appreciate the humor and depth of this inherited knowledge.)

Calvino writes about food's special ability to capture a moment in time. In one scene, he describes a couple eating together at an orange grove in Tepotzotlan, Mexico: We had tamal de elote; A good pasta of sweet corn, with pork and very hot peppers, all steamed in a cob leaf; And then we had chiles en nogada, where small, wrinkled red-brown peppers swam in a nutty sauce whose harsh, bitter taste faded into a sweet, creamy taste." Calvino shows with a mesmerizing style how a good meal can be the center of the world for a moment, and how a meal for two can become a lasting moment. This story has been published in Iran in a collection titled "The King is Listening".

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3. "Swann's Way", by Marcel Proust

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

I know you've been waiting for this one. Madeleine (a French pastry) "side of Swan's house" are so unforgettable that I confess I never eat them whole, because a real madeleine spoils my memory of the one Proust described in his book. On a winter's day, the narrator comes home to his mother, who gives him some "tea and small cakes and pastries" called "little madeleines". Depressingly, I drank a spoonful of tea with a piece of I had soaked the cake in it. As soon as the warm liquid and the cake crumbs in it touched my mouth, a shudder went through my whole body, and I stopped and gave my full attention to the amazing changes that were taking place. A beautiful pleasure gripped my senses, but it was unique and gave me no indication of its origin. And in one moment, the ups and downs of life had become meaningless to me, its sufferings were insignificant, and its brevity had become imaginary... I no longer felt insignificant, random, and dull. Where did this strong feeling of happiness come from?"

Years after reading "In Search of Lost Time", sometimes I return to this moment unintentionally; The minutes slow down and my senses become stronger, and I am filled with gratitude; Because if you look carefully, you can find all the pleasures of life in a cup of tea. "The Side of Swan's House" is the first part of the "In Search of Lost Time" series.

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4. Short story "Revenge of the Lawn" by Richard Bratigan

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

Among all the literary works I have ever read, "The Lawn's Revenge" probably has the most concrete post-breakup scene. A pot of instant coffee as an excuse to invite to the house of the ex-lover, and the final blow; The feeling of familiarity and at the same time the sadness of being with someone you once knew very well. In this scene, Brattigan describes the passage of time after he convinces his ex-lover to have coffee with him:

I knew it would take a year for the water to start boiling. It was October and there was a lot of water in the pan... I poured half of the water into the sink. Now the water was boiling faster. It only takes six months. The house was quiet. I looked at the back porch. The garbage bags were there. I stared at the trash, trying to figure out what he'd been eating lately by looking at the dishes and wrappers and stuff. I did not understand anything. Now it was March. The water started to boil. I was happy about that.

Or, as Brattigan says elsewhere in the story, Sometimes life is just about coffee and how much intimacy a cup of coffee brings. The short story "Chaman's Revenge" is one of the stories published in the "Old Bus" collection.

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5. The novel "Goodbye, Columbus" (Goodbye, Columbus) written by Philip Roth

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

Food is inseparable everywhere in Roth's works. But let's leave out the liver dish in Portnoy's Complaint, the meat sandwich in American Pastoral, and all that Tiptree strawberry jam. Roth's descriptions aren't just sensual. They are very dynamic, involving class and wealth, and a means of introducing the desires and grievances of his characters.

In the story "Goodbye, Columbus" the main character opens an old refrigerator; In fact, the second refrigerator of his luxurious summer house; And he notices that the refrigerator is full of fresh, juicy, fragrant and expensive fruits: "The shelves were full of fruit, in every color, every texture, and inside them lay various kernels. Green tomatoes, black plums, red plums, apricots, nectarines, peaches, long bunches of black, yellow, red grapes and cherries, cherries that fell out of the boxes and fried everywhere... I picked a handful of cherries and then a nectarine, and straight to I bit his core." This gas, after that luxurious description, is full of boldness and a little sacrilegious; Probably, in this way, he wanted to cross an invisible red line.

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6. The novel "Sentimental Education" by Gustave Flaubert

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

According to Flaubert, he was trying to narrate the moral history of the men of his generation. In his works, food plays a prominent role in the trials of some of his characters. The decline of Paris in the 1840s is perplexing to Frdric Moreau, the protagonist of The Education of Sentiments. At a dinner party held in a large room covered with red cloths and filled with the light of chandeliers and candelabra, the hosts served their extravagant guests champagne-soaked caviar, grilled quail, meatballs with bechamel sauce, pasrokh quebec and potatoes and truffles. .

In another memorable scene from the party, many bottles of champagne are opened simultaneously, and "tall fountains of champagne flow into the air ... each opened a bottle and drenched the faces of his companions" while Small birds flew into space through the open door of the dovecote; Some of them sat "like big flowers" in women's hair. There is no doubt that in the scenes where Moreau escapes from Parisian society, such scenes of abundance and excess of food are no longer seen. "Pachinko" novel written by Min Jin Lee

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

In Pachinko, Min Jin Lee's amazing and legendary story of the life of a Family In 20th century Korea and Japan, food represents the passage of time, loss, need and nature. Consider the abundant forest mushrooms that Sonja stole, along with the first man she fell in love with. or the worry and anxiety that his unlikely marriage brought; The rice that was cleverly prepared, the pieces of moss that were folded like cloth, the noodle soup that was being cooked under the watchful eyes of the two fiancs, a couple that didn't know each other at all. Lee's wonderful descriptions of food demand the reader's attention; And it shows us how hard it is to turn nature into food.

The reader is faced with delicious pancakes made from water and bean flour, a bucket full of crab and fish, homemade pumpkin toffee, fish Kettle, a soup kettle "half-filled with water, potato wedges, and onions, waiting to be put on the fire." None of the novels I've read lately can describe food as simple yet sumptuous as well. Much of the power of "Pachinko" lies in the generation gap, a story that shows how long life can be, and how resilience and patience can help us get through life.

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<8. The novel "The Sun Also Rises" by Ernest Hemingway

BingMag.com 8 memorable descriptions of food in famous books; From Haruki Murakami to Marcel Proust

Anyone who has ever put on a pair of rubber boots and stood in the cool waters of a deep river on a hot day looking for trout, and caught one. dropped, can tell how much fun it is to hunt, cook, and ultimately eat your own dinner. I think that's one of the reasons I've read The Sun Still Blows so many times, a book that asks so many important questions about life, one of the most important of which is: Why am I not in Spain right now looking for trout in the Irati River? ?

"The Sun Still Blows" has a quality I'll never quite understand; Its story takes place a century ago and somehow still feels fresh. I find that you can read it at any age and still understand Jake; The American narrator of the story whose love for an unattainable woman is the motivation for his travels. Another memorable scene depicts Jake and his friend on a train from Paris to Pamplona, driven by nostalgia and love of travel: We ate sandwiches and drank wine and looked out the window at the country. The seeds were just turning green and the plains were full of anemones. The pasture was green, and its great trees were outside, and through them sometimes a palace or a river could be seen. In their journey, we see the impermanence and astonishment that mix together just like in real life.

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