How did Tolkien draw inspiration from his life experiences to create Middle Earth?

Audiences have mixed feelings about Amazon's new Lord of the Rings series, The Rings of Power. People are rightly skeptical of anything Amazon puts out into the world, but anything about Middle-earth and Tolkien has its fans. Being in the history of Middle-earth, both conceptually and literally, will always be extremely enjoyable for you. There were many surprises in this fantasy world, part of which was Tolkien's art and innate talent in world-building, and another part was the effects of world events at that time on Tolkien. In a word, Middle-earth is as much a producer of modern fantasy as we know it today, but it is also a reflection of the events of its time (albeit certainly not in the best way). Literature, in any form, arises. Throughout his life, he was an enthusiastic researcher, the most important manifestation of which was seen during his studies at Oxford. The curmudgeon young Tolkien was building fantasy worlds in his head, creating new languages for their inhabitants and drawing pictures of these worlds. While in reality he should have been writing an article.

BingMag.com How did Tolkien draw inspiration from his life experiences to create Middle Earth?

Audiences have mixed feelings about Amazon's new Lord of the Rings series, The Rings of Power. People are rightly skeptical of anything Amazon puts out into the world, but anything about Middle-earth and Tolkien has its fans. Being in the history of Middle-earth, both conceptually and literally, will always be extremely enjoyable for you. There were many surprises in this fantasy world, part of which was Tolkien's art and innate talent in world-building, and another part was the effects of world events at that time on Tolkien. In a word, Middle-earth is as much a producer of modern fantasy as we know it today, but it is also a reflection of the events of its time (albeit certainly not in the best way). Literature, in any form, arises. Throughout his life, he was an enthusiastic researcher, the most important manifestation of which was seen during his studies at Oxford. The curmudgeon young Tolkien was building fantasy worlds in his head, creating new languages for their inhabitants and drawing pictures of these worlds. While in reality he should have been writing an article.

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Of course, he ended up graduating with A's because he was able to properly balance his personal interests with his major. balance His interests covered a wide spectrum: from classical literature to traditional literature, linguistics and even mythology of different cultures. Unfortunately, this young man with his exceptional imagination met with hostility and Britain entered the First World War in 1914. It is true that Tolkien's education could have exempted him from war, but he was pressured to join the war, as were many men of his age. By the time he had completed his finale.

BingMag.com How did Tolkien draw inspiration from his life experiences to create Middle Earth?

Tolkien was initially reluctant to participate in the war. , but this experience was too terrifying for him. By the time he was sent back from the front line due to "trench fever", many of his comrades and old friends he had known since school had been killed in front of his eyes. From then on, he would spend the remaining years of his service on medical leave or in barracks. Even writing, which was one of his few sources of relaxation during this period, was influenced by the concepts that the war had taught him. As a result, concepts such as eliminating social barriers and class divide were seen more in his writings. But his other source of comfort was his beloved wife, Edith, who once visited him and danced for him in the hemlock garden. A memory so influential that it inspired the core of The Silmarillion:

I never called Edith Lthien, but in fact she was the main source of the story that eventually became the core of The Silmarillion. The initial idea came to me in a small wooded area full of hemlock trees at Roos in Yorkshire (where I was briefly in command of an outpost of the Humber Barracks in 1917 and he was able to live with me for a while). In those days, his hair was raven, his skin was clear and his eyes were so bright that you couldn't look into them. He could sing and dance at that time. But the story has changed. Now I am left alone, and there is no Mandosi to pray to.

Not surprisingly, however, most of his stories did not develop solidly until he was discharged from military service in 1920. . During this period, Tolkien worked in universities as an associate professor and reader (a person known in the academic community to confirm the validity of research) and also as a private tutor. He also spent much of his time translating ancient texts, including Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the ancient legend of Beowulf.

All these experiences , the lows and highs, bitterness and sweetness were the foundation for the creation of the middle land. Finally, during Tolkien's tenure at Pembroke College, he completed writing the complete version of The Hobbit, thereby beginning the creation of the legend of the land that would eventually become the masterpiece of the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

BingMag.com How did Tolkien draw inspiration from his life experiences to create Middle Earth?

In response to the question, who did Tolkien accept as a perfect human being and who or what school was he influenced by? Everything and everyone. He was a sensitive man who absorbed many things from the world he lived in like a sponge, but his intelligence and critical thinking skills allowed him to incorporate his own opinions into what he absorbed from the world around him. Certainly, these opinions have been the factor that has caused the creation and development of Middle-earth as a unique world.

What is clear is that Tolkien was a devout Christian almost throughout his life, and for this reason, he created Middle-earth. A world with standards Christian has created. After all, stories in Tolkien's world revolve around the battle of good versus evil. In a letter to his friend, the Jesuit priest Robert Murray, he explains:

The Lord of the Rings is definitely a religious and Catholic work in its structure. This is what happened unconsciously at first, but expanded into conscious transcription. Actually, in rewriting references to something like "religion," I didn't include cults or practices in my fantasy world, but I also didn't remove things that were there. For this reason, religious elements and symbolism have been absorbed in the depth of the story.

According to what has been said, researchers definitely believe that Middle-earth is full of references to idolatry and polytheism, which shows that Tolkien until the last During the days of his life, he was a committed scientist and a devout Catholic.

But perhaps what can be seen more than these symbols and religiosity in Tolkien's works is his interest in nature. Influenced by his childhood and memories of the kind he had with Edith in the hemlock forest, this interest has shaped not only the natural environments of Middle-earth, but also its inhabitants. For example, the elves, in fact, nature is a part of their existence and are strongly in harmony with nature. Although environmental protection had not yet become a serious and political position during Tolkien's lifetime, from the beginning Tolkien was a staunch defender of preserving beautiful things and above all nature.

BingMag.com How did Tolkien draw inspiration from his life experiences to create Middle Earth?

However, perhaps the most controversial point in Middle-earth, which has always attracted a lot of attention, is its racist tone. If we want to examine this historical masterpiece as a historian, we must always remember that we should not examine issues from a modern perspective and through a completely modern lens, and instead we must pay attention to the context of the time when that work was produced. That being said, it is important to note when reviewing Middle-earth that Tolkien wrote and created Middle-earth during the height of xenophobia and wartime anxiety (the books were written between 1937 and 1949, but he wrote mainly during World War II. has worked on their evolution).

The phrase "yellow peril" (a racial metaphor depicting the people of East and Southeast Asia as an existential threat to the Western world.) when discussing descriptions Tolkien's racism is very visible and they don't say wrong. Orcs are a stereotypical symbol of East Asian people in terms of character and nature. They do not meet the moral standards accepted by Christians and are the embodiment of wartime propaganda "West is good, East is bad." Elves, on the contrary, are very similar to Germans in their physical features and pale and dark complexions. Probably, this similarity is influenced by Tolkien's anger at the extension of anti-Nazi attitude to anti-German attitude. Rings"

Of course, we should also quickly point out that Tolkien considered himself a person with anti-racist thoughts, and it can be well imagined that this statement He is quite reasonable for that time period and currents of society. In addition, he was strongly opposed to Nazi racial theories and strongly disagreed with theories that were against war under any circumstances, especially in the case of the Nazis. However, he was interested in German culture and mythology, so at the time he was adamant that Germans should not be equated with Nazis.

By modern standards, of course. We do not consider such half-and-half attitudes to be satisfactory and we can dare to say that it is even problematic, but in examining an issue that occurred in a different historical period, it is necessary to know what the dominant thinking was at that time and the beliefs of individuals may be from Where did it come from? You can't judge the morals of the past by today's standards.

In any case, Tolkien most likely created them in ignorance of how to interpret these racial issues, which is a shame, but the same thing can tell us. It shows that even the most talented writers sometimes make mistakes.

It can be concluded that despite the racial mistakes that Tolkien made, he was an intelligent man who lived a rich and sometimes painful life, and the sum of such a life was that It gave birth to Middle Earth. Of course, there are countless cases in Tolkien's masterpiece Hossein and the issues that inspired him to create this world, all of which can be examined, and this was only a short introduction to get to know Tolkien's life and how to create Middle-earth. There are many reliable sources that you can refer to if you are interested and get to know Tolkien's life and his unique genius.

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