Why have we never seen Stanley Kubrick’s Napoleon?

Stanley Kubrick directed thirteen films during his forty-year career, but the nine projects he made since 1960 have all become classics. have became. He was nominated four times for the Oscar for the films "Dr. Strangelove", "2001: A Space Odyssey", "A Clockwork Orange" and "Barry Lyndon". It won in the Best Director category, and all of these films except "2001: A Space Odyssey" were also nominated for the Best Picture award. He brought Stephen King's brilliant horror novel The Shining to the big screen and brought ancient historical figures to life in Spartacus, but his most surprising and ambitious project is probably the one that never got beyond pre-production. It didn't go.

BingMag.com Why have we never seen Stanley Kubrick’s Napoleon?

Stanley Kubrick directed thirteen films during his forty-year career, but the nine projects he made since 1960 have all become classics. have became. He was nominated four times for the Oscar for the films "Dr. Strangelove", "2001: A Space Odyssey", "A Clockwork Orange" and "Barry Lyndon". It won in the Best Director category, and all of these films except "2001: A Space Odyssey" were also nominated for the Best Picture award. He brought Stephen King's brilliant horror novel The Shining to the big screen and brought ancient historical figures to life in Spartacus, but his most surprising and ambitious project is probably the one that never got beyond pre-production. It didn't go.

The story goes that after the successful film "2001: A Space Odyssey" told the entire story of humanity, Kubrick wanted to choose a more specific goal for his next film. In a memo dated October 20, 1971, Kubrick wrote that he planned to write a screenplay based on the life of Napoleon Bonaparte, the French emperor, and said, "I want this movie to be the best movie ever." He later said that he wanted legendary stars like Audrey Hepburn and Jack Nicholson to play the lead roles. But still, why is the name of the biographical film "Napoleon" not visible in Kubrick's IMDb list? It was too ambitious

In a BBC article, Stanley Kubrick collected 276 books on Napoleon's life and did extensive research all over Europe, and put everything he learned into a screenplay. 148 pages thick summarized. But the MGM studio owned the rights to the film and did not allow the project to go beyond the research and planning stage. In 1969, Kirk Kerkorian bought MGM and, as usual, with the new ownership, the course of the studio's activities also changed. Ultimately, the scale and gigantic budget of Kubrick's project intimidated new studio officials.

The BBC's Nicholas Barber said: "The new owners of MGM would rather build a casino than finance a memorable historical drama film that required He had 50,000 black soldiers. Mosfilm also had Waterloo, directed by Dino De Laurentiis, scheduled for release in October 1970, and Kubrick quickly moved into production on Cookie Orange and Barry Lyndon.

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