Why does Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood need a Spaghetti Western sequel?

The wait for Quentin Tarantino's latest work will end in a few days; HarperCollins Publishing is on the verge of publishing the first critical work of the "Pulp Fiction" director called "Cinema Speculation". In this book, Tarantino discussed the cinematographic works of the 70s that influenced his worldview and cinema. Of course, last year he also wrote his latest film, "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" in the form of a long novel with more details, which was also published by HarperCollins and met with good critical reactions.

BingMag.com Why does Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood need a Spaghetti Western sequel?

The wait for Quentin Tarantino's latest work will end in a few days; HarperCollins Publishing is on the verge of publishing the first critical work of the "Pulp Fiction" director called "Cinema Speculation". In this book, Tarantino discussed the cinematographic works of the 70s that influenced his worldview and cinema. Of course, last year he also wrote his latest film, "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" in the form of a long novel with more details, which was also published by HarperCollins and met with good critical reactions.

It seems that Tarantino, by making the three-hour movie "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" produced in 2019 and turning it into a 400-page novel, has extracted the juice of the story of TV cowboy Rick Dalton (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) and his sweet stuntman Cliff Booth (played by Brad Pitt). It is drawn out and there is nothing new to offer. However, there is still a neglected part of the story that, if addressed, could be the best part of the book and movie; Rick and Cliff arrive in Rome to film a deserted spaghetti western. But why could this plot be a good choice for Tarantino's next movie?

The movie and the book ignored Rick and Cliff's troubles in Italy

BingMag.com Why does Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood need a Spaghetti Western sequel?

One of the first sequences of the movie (and of course the novel) is related to Rick Dalton's meeting with a producer named Marvin Schwartz (played by Al Pacino). Schwartz tells Rick that the only ticket out for the veteran TV cowboy right now is a trip to Rome and a spaghetti western.

The spaghetti western was a genre invented by Italians inspired by American westerns. And it was often a copy of some of these movies. Of course, something similar to what happened to Rick in "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" has also happened in the real world, and prominent actors such as Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and Anthony Quinn in the 60s and 70s at some point were forced to save their careers in movies. Play this genre.

The proud Rick Dalton, who until a few years ago was the star of western movies and had many fans all over the world, cannot deal with the fact that his career is on the downslope and he needs to save it. Agree to appear in Spaghetti Western movies. The result of this denial is the crazy and funny anger and depression that afflicts him. In this situation, it is only his friend and stuntman Cliff, who sympathizes with Rick and assures him that going to Rome to act in a movie is not as bad as he thinks.

But what a movie. And the book doesn't mention much about the events they encounter in Italy while filming, only saying that Rick and Cliff fly to Italy to film a spaghetti western. Of course, Tarantino emphasizes in the film that their stay in Italy was six months and with Kurt Russell's short monologue, there is a brief reference to the good and bad experiences they went through during this time:

(Rick) didn't like the Italian way of making movies, he didn't like that "each actor speaks his own language" and he found the way of shooting European movies ridiculous.

This monologue refers to the fact that some companies The producers of Italian western movies like Chine Chita in the 60's and 70's took it and based on it, each actor said the dialogues in his native language, which made a non-Italian artist not even understand the dialogues of the actor in front of him. In this monologue, Tarantino humorously deals with the challenge that the English-speaking actors were dealing with, but he summarizes the story of Rick and Cliff's trip to Italy on the same level to reach the main story, which is the story of Sharon Tate and the Manson family. /p>

But the situation in the book is a little different and it seems that Tarantino does not mind to have a special look at the adventures of the Italian trip. For example, in a part of Cliff's book, he describes a memory of that era; He is put in front of an amateur Italian actor who played the role of a Mexican bandit for a stunt, and he is injured in the eye due to being hit by a gun butt. Having said that, maybe Tarantino has more narratives from the time of shooting Spaghetti Westerns with Rick and Cliff and will present them in the form of a movie sequel or novel to the fans of "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood".

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The Italian film industry in the 1960s was nothing like the Wild West

BingMag.com Why does Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood need a Spaghetti Western sequel?

The Italian studio Cheetah was like a Wild West in comparison to the efficient Hollywood studios and produced strange and dangerous events in the 60s. Put this aside from Rick Dalton's inherent cowardice for a hilarious comedy

Among the mind-boggling adventures during the filming of spaghetti westerns, we can mention what happened during the filming of "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" in 1966; Apparently, in one sequence, Ilay Valak was close to losing his head due to the passing of a train. Fortunately, Valak was lucky and lived in perfect health until the age of 98. Another example is the civil war sequence in the same movie where Clint Eastwood refuses to cross the exploding bridge because Spaghetti Western directors like Sergio Leone did not use stunts for the explosion sequences and instead set the scene on fire with real dynamite!

Given all of this, imagine Rick Dalton in the backstage chaos of Spaghetti Western movies for a moment, and you'll get plenty of Tarantino-style gory sequences; For example, imagine that the actor opposite Rick loses his head during filming and right in front of his eyes, and Cliff, while trying to wipe the blood from his and Rick's head and face, in an unsuccessful attempt to calm down his friend in order to continue. Filming arrives.

Or imagine a scene where Rick is lying on a cutting board and tries to repeat the monologue, but each time he does it worse than the last time. The reason for this lack of focus is not because of excessive drinking, but because the real saw is working right next to his ear and the noise prevents him from delivering the monologue properly!

Tarantino can at least one season of devote his novel to Western Spaghetti

BingMag.com Why does Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood need a Spaghetti Western sequel?

The question that arose after the publication of the novel "Once Upon a Time" In Hollywood" occupied the minds of many die-hard fans of Tarantino, is whether the director, who has a habit of leaving many of his projects half-finished, went to write this book for God's sake and even more profit, or other plans. In any case, if we are realistic, we have to admit that since Tarantino and Leonardo DiCaprio are not interested in sequels, there is little chance of making Once Upon a Time in Hollywood 2. Of course, Tarantino has "Kill Bill 1 and 2" in his portfolio, but these two parts were one film from the beginning, which were divided into two parts due to the long time. Apart from this, Brad Pitt does not have another movie sequel in his career except for Steven Soderbergh's "Ocean" trilogy. Having said that, can't Tarantino dedicate a novel to the adventures of Cliff and Rick in Italy? The answer is probably positive, and the director himself has thought of at least one chapter of this possible book.

Quentin Tarantino last year in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter about Django & Django, the Italian documentary that tells the life of famed Spaghetti Western director Sergio Corbucci, has revealed many details about a chapter of the novel about Rick Dalton and producer Marvin Schwartz's dinner meeting with Sergio Corbucci and his wife Nori. This dinner is a kind of test for Rick's appearance in this director's next film, but Rick's lack of intelligence works here as well and he confuses Sergio Corbucci with Sergio Leone over and over again and makes fun of his previous films and creates embarrassing moments.

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Tarantino's new book is his first non-fiction work

BingMag.com Why does Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood need a Spaghetti Western sequel?

If Tarantino actually decides to write a sequel to Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, it will be years before reach readers; Because he has left other efforts such as playwriting, writing the novel "Reservoir Dogs" and dozens of screenplays unfinished, and he still hasn't started making his tenth movie, which is said to be his last work.

Therefore. Fans of "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" should make do with "Meditation in Cinema" as Tarantino's first non-fiction work and wait for his strange and sudden decisions.

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