Why are “No” and some of the most important recent films seasoned?

"Intertitle" has existed since the early days of cinema history, but in recent years it is used in a different way and new meanings has found. The interlude divides the story into several smaller parts and often has a black background instead of appearing on the film images and gives each part of the story a specific name. This common trend can now be found in most feature films: "No," "The Power of the Dog," "The French Report," "The North Man," "The Last Duel," "The Green Knight," "No Good," and "The worst person in the world". This list is long and we can expect to see these chapters in future works, but why? Why are filmmakers suddenly interested in this process? The short answer may be that the subtitles add poetry to the film and so-called prestige, but for a more complete answer, we need to travel back in time.

BingMag.com Why are “No” and some of the most important recent films seasoned?

"Intertitle" has existed since the early days of cinema history, but in recent years it is used in a different way and new meanings has found. The interlude divides the story into several smaller parts and often has a black background instead of appearing on the film images and gives each part of the story a specific name. This common trend can now be found in most feature films: "No," "The Power of the Dog," "The French Report," "The North Man," "The Last Duel," "The Green Knight," "No Good," and "The worst person in the world". This list is long and we can expect to see these chapters in future works, but why? Why are filmmakers suddenly interested in this process? The short answer may be that the subtitles add poetry to the film and so-called prestige, but for a more complete answer, we need to travel back in time.

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Once upon a time, before you could hear the voices of the characters, you had to read the text to watch the movies. Sometimes a character's mouth would move and then a subtitle would arrive so that we could understand what that character was saying. If someone did not understand the language of the text or was not literate, he would not face much problem, the pictures were enough to tell the story, but for those who wanted to know more details, the subtitles that were next to the pictures were helpful.

When silent cinema came to an end and sound films took center stage in the late 20s, intertitles seemed unnecessary, as they no longer needed to be used to deliver character dialogue; Despite this, filmmakers still used it to provide additional information about characters and events. For example, the western film "The Great Road" (1930), the first film in which "John Wayne" played a role, has sound, but subtitles are used so that the audience understands what is going on in the minds of the characters. For example, we learn that one character "prays for peace but is ready to go to war" or another thinks that "the dead don't come back; They stay and move forward at the same time. Their souls guide them." The interjections of the great path are not vital, but they are considered instructive and enlightening.

There are certainly better techniques to inform the audience about the thoughts and views of the characters, the most obvious of which is to hear the character's voice as a narrator, this old method of The tense of "Kin's fellow citizen" is still used today. For this reason, if you see a movie using subtitles, it is a conscious choice by the filmmaker, which, if used correctly and accurately, will make the film a better work, but in the hands of an amateur filmmaker, subtitles can be ridiculous and trivial. It has been a while since intertitles have faded in the film industry, but its strong comeback in the last decade is not hidden by anyone, although it has a clear difference from the past: it is not used to provide story details, but it is dramatic, self-aware and provocative, it grabs your attention. It does or creates suspense.

It is easy to attribute the return of intertextuality to the personal desires of filmmakers who want their work to seem "literary" and reminiscent of a book (some of the aforementioned films are adaptations such as The Power of the Dog or The Green Knight). and it can be understood that the creator wants to bring them closer to the original source). This reason is acceptable but seems a little superficial. Especially since most books have multiple chapters and movies can't have as many chapters due to limitations, and you won't find many filmmakers who secretly want their movies to be close to the structure of the books! They are well aware that they are working in a different medium and are making a film that is a visual experience for the audience. As a result, with a little digging, we might be able to get better answers.

BingMag.com Why are “No” and some of the most important recent films seasoned?

Although intertitles never became obsolete (nothing is left out forever in Hollywood), most moviegoers probably remember it from Quentin Tarantino's "Popular Story" (1994), a brilliant production that uses a non-linear structure. and provides each section with a subtitle. In popular fiction, it is well known that the function of intertitles is not the same as in silent films. They don't reflect what the characters say, but at the same time, they don't help us understand the events, and reading them doesn't help us get a better understanding of what we're watching. These interjections do not provide new information but indicate information that is to come: a character or a symbol. When you read the two words "Golden Hour", You become a little more curious and want to know what's going on sooner.

This approach is smarter than you think: a trick to take you away from the story for a moment and focus your attention on the direction the filmmaker wants. Also, be prepared to change the atmosphere and turn the story. For a better example, consider Stanley Kubrick's use of intertextuality in The Shining (1980). In Stephen King's original novel, interjections are often descriptive: "interview," "phone booth," etc. But in the film, they mark the passage of time in a way that is eerie and unconventional.

BingMag.com Why are “No” and some of the most important recent films seasoned?

Kubrick has created with these interjections what the English writer "Robert Lockhurst" describes as "watching time and tightening screws". First we have "a month later", then "Tuesday", then "Saturday", then "Wednesday", "Monday" and "four o'clock". At first glance, it seems that they are only reporting the passing of time, but what the interjections have done is more important, they give the feeling that we are counting down the minutes to a terrible and ominous event.

To this The order, the interjection becomes a part of the story and gives it depth. Arguably, other great filmmakers before and after Tarantino and Kubrick have used this technique, from Wong Kar Wai and Lars von Trier to Paul Thomas Andersen and Wes Andersen. These flexible interjections are everywhere, from Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) to Moonlight (2016). And this technique is not exclusive to Hollywood, filmmakers around the world have always used it to tell their stories as they see fit.

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The screenwriter gives the filmmakers the opportunity to draw your attention to different issues and storylines. In The Worst Man in the World, the story is told in 12 chapters, titled "Julie's Circus of Narcissism," "Bad Timing," "Final Speech," and the like. The effect of the interlude in the film is that it has made us face a number of short stories that are all related to each other and approach Julie's character from new angles. Since the main theme of the film is to decide to be the author of your own life, the interjections and the chaptering of the story have helped the filmmaker's desired form. It provides the usual set of information ("a few years later", "Russian land" to the end). However, The Northman is constructed in such a way that it feels like a fairy tale that has traveled through history and time to reach us in this moment, without trying to pretend. In this regard, the intertitles are presented in an old Scandinavian alphabet and style, and seem to pay homage to the classical cinematic traditions, as if we are watching an opera or an old theater play based on local legends. These subtitles ask us to forget every big blockbuster action movie we've seen and step into the pre-modern era.

BingMag.com Why are “No” and some of the most important recent films seasoned?

Perhaps the most surprising use of subtitles is The Answer No, the latest from Jordan Peele, which combines horror and sci-fi with westerns. The story is divided into several chapters by the subtitles, and each one carries the name of an animal, a horse, a chimpanzee and another creature that you will get to know after watching the movie. These interjections are a key part of the negative answer. None of them have the names of humans, so they purposefully draw your attention to the non-human characters so that you can follow their presence in each scene more carefully. Did it change horror?

The negative answer also refers to the first motion picture in history, which was made in 1878 by "Edward Muybridge", for Jordan Peele, but more importantly than the image, it is the black horseman who nobody He is not aware of his name and background. History has forgotten the horseman's name, but remembers the horse's name ("Annie"); The interjections of the negative answer also focus on this historical fact.

These types of interjections are not used with the purpose of expanding the narrative of the story, but they want to be effective in terms of the theme, and this effectiveness is important. Poets are masters of naming their works and most of the time they choose a title that expands the meaning of the poem; In other words, the poet makes a double-edged sword with the name he has chosen and has a small reference to the theme that you will read next. By looking at the title of the poem, you can guess what it is supposed to be about or what message the poet is trying to convey. Naming the chapters of the novel serves a similar purpose and indicates what you will read next. Similarly, modern cinematic interludes that break up a film into chapters are similar. Of course, the sound element and the familiarity of today's audience with The structure of films (you can easily detect the passage of time) has made intertitles unnecessary, so they are used directionally in the film as the filmmaker pursues a specific goal.

All the above examples to They also point out another interesting point: by dividing the story into several chapters, the interlude reminds you that you are watching a movie or, in other words, questions the self-awareness and realism of the movie. Sometimes, while watching an important movie, you get immersed in it for a short or long time, and this feeling is beautiful in itself, but the intertextuality flips you and you get out of that immersion for a moment. Suddenly you are no longer looking at pictures, you are reading a small text and you are reminded that this is a movie; A film made by an artist with the intention that you, as an audience, have a different emotional experience. Subtitles help you watch movies from a new perspective.

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