“Top Guns: Mavericks” and the Definition of Inherited Hollywood Success Movies

Despite the release of "Avatar" and "Spinal Fever", is the controversy of the late sequels a sign of Hollywood escaping risk? Next week, Hollywood will gamble $ 300 million on "Top Gun: Maverick," a sequel to the movie that aired thirty-six years ago. One of the most exciting projects in the Cannes Film Festival market, where the rights to unpublished films are sold, was the sequel to "This is Spinal Tap." A film that was released thirty-eight years ago. This Christmas, we will have the sequel to the best-selling James Cameron movie, "Avatar," which, compared to other such sequels, was released only after thirteen years. In the meantime, in the summer, after 25 years of the return of "Railroad Kids," we will have a classic, family-run film. It seems to be at its peak late, so that even the oldest compositions can be taken out of storage for re-distribution. Top Gun: Maverick, in which Tom Cruise pursues the charming character of his middle-aged pilot, is set to star in the likes of Indiana Jones, Ghostbusters, Jurassic World, Rambo, Crazy Max, and Star Wars to try to turn fans' sense of nostalgia for a successful series into a popular blockbuster movie. It's Hollywood money-making plans. "Hollywood hates risk," he says. Hollywood is trying to avoid risk. So everything must have been sold before. When we talk about late sequels, we are really talking about the need to invest in projects that have already been successful. The common denominator is risk reduction.

BingMag.com “Top Guns: Mavericks” and the Definition of Inherited Hollywood Success Movies

Despite the release of "Avatar" and "Spinal Fever", is the controversy of the late sequels a sign of Hollywood escaping risk? Next week, Hollywood will gamble $ 300 million on "Top Gun: Maverick," a sequel to the movie that aired thirty-six years ago. One of the most exciting projects in the Cannes Film Festival market, where the rights to unpublished films are sold, was the sequel to "This is Spinal Tap." A film that was released thirty-eight years ago. This Christmas, we will have the sequel to the best-selling James Cameron movie, "Avatar," which, compared to other such sequels, was released only after thirteen years. In the meantime, in the summer, after 25 years of the return of "Railroad Kids," we will have a classic, family-run film. It seems to be at its peak late, so that even the oldest compositions can be taken out of storage for re-distribution. Top Gun: Maverick, in which Tom Cruise pursues the charming character of his middle-aged pilot, is set to star in the likes of Indiana Jones, Ghostbusters, Jurassic World, Rambo, Crazy Max, and Star Wars to try to turn fans' sense of nostalgia for a successful series into a popular blockbuster movie. It's Hollywood money-making plans. "Hollywood hates risk," he says. Hollywood is trying to avoid risk. So everything must have been sold before. When we talk about late sequels, we are really talking about the need to invest in projects that have already been successful. The common denominator is risk reduction.

Guides adds that it does not matter that the release of these films dates back a long time. If something is successful at any time and in any way, then it has a higher chance of getting the green light because the audience has some kind of background awareness about it. What Hollywood and the stakeholders who run it dislike is what we call originality. He calls it hereditary films. He says he hopes the film will appeal to fans of the original film and a new generation of fans who will be added later. Mitchell adds: "You definitely want to attract both old fans who know and like the movie and new fans who may not know and care about these old characters so much that you can create a new character for them." p>

The economics of the film industry says that you can not just profit from the hereditary fans of the film. That's why "Top Gun: Maverick" gave viewers a number of young actors, unique aerial imagery, close-up stunts that are interesting to all, as well as the return of Tom Cruise to his star character. These are expected to be popular enough to draw large crowds to the cinema.

Anna Smith, host of the "Girl on Film" podcast, points to the generational change: "I guess "Some of the fans of these films have now grown up and are working in the film industry and supporting such screens. Now they are either involved in film production or in journalism or anywhere else."

Mitchell "The interesting thing is that Tom Cruise himself is a marketing tool," he said. In the years following the original "Top Guns", the film that kept him at the forefront was the "Mission Impossible" series, which is known for Tom Cruise doing his own stunts. People are excited to see this vital element in Top Gun: Maverick. And they use it to present films to those whose age does not reach the original Top Gun movie and who knows him as "Mission Impossible". They have integrated the new: maintaining the original film with familiar actors and storylines, along with newer and more up-to-date faces and characters. Mitchell in this regard to the astonishing results of "Indina Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull"; Released in 2008, nineteen years after its predecessor, it cites a milestone: "Many people at the time doubted whether anyone else cared about the film and Harrison Ford." With the success of Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Jurassic Park in 2015, this trend began: "Especially in the case of 'Power Rises,' if the main actors could be brought together again."

Mitchell adds that this is what the Ghostbusters series learned. Unfortunately, a lot of the feedback to the parallel worlds of 2016 is bad And anti-woman, but there was also an honest response from fans who asked: "How can you recreate 'Ghost Hunters' without the main actors?"

Although many of these inherited sequels are based on popular collections. And they are bestsellers, but not always. Popular culture can take many forms and take advantage of intense and long-term interest. The hit film "Heritage: Theron" in 2010 was a sequel to the thriller "Theron" in 1981, which, despite low box office sales, gained a passionate cult over the years, something that tops with "Top Guns." Or "Star Wars" is very different. "Theron's legacy in particular showed that film studios can take advantage of different things in their archives," says Mitchell. In this way, films such as "Blade Runner 2049" in 2017 and "Bill and Ted Face Music", released in 2020, have arrived, both of which are acclaimed old-fashioned but low-selling productions.

  • Excerpts from "Top Gun: Maverick"; A better sequel than the original movie

On the other hand, "Avatar" seems to have another way of being released. Guides says that "Avatar 2" has been under construction since "Avatar 1". Following the box office success and becoming the most lucrative film of all time, director James Cameron announced the production of a series of sequels that have been in production ever since. "You might think that Cameron's attachment to the characters and the world he created for them is weird, if you can call it that, but Cameron has been making a sequel since the first Avatar movie was made," says Guides. Is. "It only took a long time to screen them."

Source: guardian

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