Home > Art and cinema > Movies and series
Reading time estimate: 54 min

Top 15 John Ford films from worst to best (filmmaker under a magnifying glass)

BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

"My name is John Ford, I'm making Westerns." This is one of the most famous quotes of a director in the history of cinema. At a time when this genre was not taken very seriously and it took some time for a great man like Andre Bazin to mention it as the original meaning of cinema. Many years have passed since the death of John Ford, and what he has left us with is far beyond his achievements in the Western genre, and many of his works have stood the test of time and are recorded as a great example of cinematic art. The scope of this persistence and influence is such that many rightly choose the name of John Ford as the greatest director in the history of cinema. In this list, we will review 15 of his great films.

Orson Welles the Great once said in response to the question of how he learned cinema: "I learned the costume of cinema from pre-masters." I mean pre-costume masters like John Ford, John Ford and John Ford. Wells says this from the depths of his being and with complete honesty, because during the making of the glorious film Citizen Kane, he had watched the master's heart almost 40 times. The scope of this influence was not limited to American classicists, and even Ingmar Bergman of Sweden, one of the greatest filmmakers of modern cinema, regarded John Ford as the supreme example of an artist in cinema.

  • 250 Top directors in the history of cinema li>

There are always different themes in John Ford's cinema; from the sanctity of the family to the value of humanity, from the precise understanding of human relationships to the quest for a better world, from the struggle for victory over destiny to the acceptance of defeat and the stare of time and the embrace of death. But one thing is always more colorful in his cinema than the other: trying to build a progressive society and showing the struggle between barbarism and civilization. In his cinema, there is always an instinctual world in front of a law-abiding society, and heroism is generally sought to strike a balance between the two. As Andre Bazin is in the book of cinema? The following chapter of Western cinema states that this man must be decisive and sometimes violent in order to establish justice in such an environment, because the requirements of that society demand it.

This view relies on the hero and the world formed around him. His heroism made John Ford one of the greatest epics in American history. In his films, especially Westerns, he portrays his heroes as ancient knights or legendary heroes to build what a civilized society needs; That is the same myth. He was the mourner and mythologist of the American community he knew, and of course sometimes, like any other great artist, he fell in love with that community, and because, like any other white American, he immigrated to the culture of his ancestors; Somewhere across the Atlantic to make a film like The Quiet Man and get a little out of America and get tired.

  • Fritz Lang's Top 10 Films; The excellence of German cinema in the heart of America

If we look closely, John Ford presents an eternal picture of human life that cannot be reduced to one subject; The world is so vast that its glory is incomprehensible with today's meters and standards and making hashtags and driving everyone to the same stick. In his cinema, home, man and woman, family, human movement towards civilization and order have always been a priority, and in various works, especially in Westerns, the contrast between barbarism, human savagery and civilized life has been highlighted. In such a context, although John Ford was the most important filmmaker in American society, the impact of his art pushed the boundaries and, like any other great artist, his work found a place among all the people of the universe. Today, John Ford's films are classified as one of the most sublime works of the seventh art; Even beyond that as the most important works of art of the twentieth century and even beyond as the most important works of art history. So John Ford himself can find a place in heaven alongside the greats of art history. Received. "Monument Valley" is known today as one of the most famous locations in the history of cinema due to the brilliant image he presented of this place.

15. Sergeant Rutledge

BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

  • Actors: Woody Stroud, Jeffrey Hunter, Constance Towers and Billy Burke
  • Product: 1960, USA
  • IMDb movie rating: 7.4 out of 10
  • Movie ratings on Raton Tomitoz: 90%

After John Ford made a number of films focusing on white life In the American West, skinheads created and portrayed their lives and struggles in overcoming the hardships of a primitive environment. It seemed to have little to do with his cinema, and this story is in fact a defense he has made against the attacks of his opponents; A work like the Cheyenne Fall movie to say that he and his cinema are not racist and are only fueled by small-minded and short-sighted people.

John Ford puts his signature on the work from the beginning. Draw the court correctly and create a completely white environment in which a black man is to be tried; The man who claims to be innocent and all the evidence in the court is fabricated. from the very beginning, John Ford correctly defines the place of people in this court and highlights the low importance of the life situation and destiny of a black man for the white majority. Although the laughter of white women at the beginning of the film seems a bit exaggerated, if we consider that these laughter is to create an environment in which the life of a black man is worthless, we will realize that the filmmaker did his job properly. .

On the other hand, Sergeant Routledge's film evokes a bit of an atmosphere like to kill a mockingbird, but there is a fundamental difference with that film here; Directed by Robert Mulligan, the main character in the story is a white man, played by Gary Goryepack, who tries to do justice to a black man and expose the low life and disgust of white people to them, but in Sergeant Routledge. The story revolves around a black character played by Woody Stroud.

On the other hand, almost all of the film is based on the testimony of witnesses on the flashback. The juxtaposition of these flashbacks creates a story that completes the story and informs us of the events that led to this trial. John Ford has created all of these narratives in a brilliant collaboration with lighting and play with color and light, creating an environment that reveals the bitter life of a black man in nineteenth-century America, but like any other first-rate work, the film's time-bound effect. It passes, and its story is still believable and interpretable in the 21st century.

John Ford made Sergeant Routledge's film at the height of his artistic career. Somewhere among his best films; Between masterpieces like Seekers and the Man Who Killed Liberty Valence. The West that he had built, step by step, and from the very beginning of his career, was slowly taking shape, and there were only a few stories left here and there that he had to complete in order for this new civilization to have its own story as well as its own storyteller. To have your own. It is in such a world that we know him as the greatest epic of the West; A primitive world that more closely resembles the primitive life of man at the beginning of history than ever before.

"A black sergeant named Braxton Routledge is accused of killing and raping a white girl. He is sent to military court, and a man named Tom Controller, who is also his superior officer, is appointed to defend Routledge. Witnesses take a stand one by one and tell their story from what they have seen. This is while there is a clear racist atmosphere in the court

14. Cheyenne Autumn Fall

BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

  • Cast: > Richard Widmark, James Stewart, Carol Baker and Carl Malden
  • Product: 1964, USA
  • IMDb movie rating: > 6.7 out of 10
  • Movie Ratings on Raton Tomitoz: 60. Was about to give up everything he had ever built; Whatever myth and whatever legendary character fit into his cinema and whatever symbolized the struggle between primitiveness and civilization. Unlike the Seekers, unlike the Delijans, and unlike many of his Westerns, he replaced American historians, even liking a legend like Wyatt Arp, who portrayed him as a hero in my beloved Clementine, and a clown in a crazy episode. He made James Stewart in his place and threw a hand. It seems that everything, even the achievements of this symbol of law and order, can be a joke for the true Western American mythologist.

    Perhaps all of this can be considered the product of America in the 1960s; An exiled American who was slowly sinking into the vortex of the Vietnam War, and his young people, raised in prosperity after World War II, had little regard for their fathers' traditions. In such a context, the dreamlike image of a filmmaker like John Ford of the Wild West with all its glory and all its equestrian heroes was no longer what the previous generation had imagined. It would take some time to realize that short-sighted perceptions and attributions of Ford cinema to racism only come from the superficial. The lost history makes it increasingly clear that John Ford was the son of his time and the American mourner he knew; An American who owes history to his mastery of storytelling and illustration. Neither black, nor white, nor red mattered to him. For him, what mattered was the constant primitive struggle that took place in the depths of the desert and the civilization in which he found homes and families; Where there was a woman and a man who farmed and farmed and lived this life together anyway.

    For John Ford, it did not matter where this barbarism came from. In my favorite film Clementine, this barbarism represents the greed of the white Clanton family, and in the man who killed Liberty Valence, a bandit. Even in the Delijan, where the Indians fall like rain on the Delijan, they are faceless, and John Ford gives them no identity. But in The Autumn of the Shine Tribe, the Indians are portrayed on the other side of John Ford's cinema by identifying and mocking them, in which a white officer can also go to the brink of madness and oppression. The film seems to be a logical continuation of Sergeant Routledge and the man who killed Liberty Valence, and now, after the end of the Western myth in the form of John Wayne - as the most important actor in the role of Western film hero - in that film, the aging filmmaker has a chance. To close his storybook, and how good it was that he lived long enough to tell most of his stories.

    In the first half of the film, the images of John Ford are magical. The departure of the Indians and the sufferings they endure in this way are beautifully depicted, and John Ford's poetic sky, as always, announces its crushing presence over everyone and everything. In such a context, the actors of the film have also played well; Carl Malden and Richard Widmark have taken on the role of director, and James Stewart is having fun in a crazy episode.

    Send in 1500 miles. The government has promised to help them, but there is no news of help, and these men and women are struggling with illness and hunger. Some decide to return to their homeland. "They are accompanied by a white teacher and some army cavalry."

    13. Drums along the Mohawk

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • Cast: Henry Fonda, Claude Colbert and John Karadine
    • Product: 1939, USA
    • IMDb movie rating: > 7.1 out of 10
    • Raton Tomitoz Movie Score: 82.

    1939 was a great year for John Ford . He made three important and enduring films this year, each of which is more brilliant than the other; On the one hand, the film had drums along the mohawk, which was successful at the box office and sold well. And, of course, the flagship of them all was Delijan's masterpiece, which until then had been the culmination of John Ford's career and the pinnacle of the Western genre. And that was just the beginning, and he was going to make the next year clusters of rage and the next year, how lush my valley was, and win two more Oscars; Fruitful years for one of the best filmmakers in history.

    John Ford made The Drums Along the Mohawk based on the novel of the same name by Walter Edmonds. He took the story to where American society and country today came from; Far from the monotonous arena of the Seven Archers and the fugitive Indians and prize-winners and the story of the expansion of the railroad and so on. In fact, much earlier than what I and the audience know from the Western genre; That is, at the time of American independence from Britain. And such a choice is a good starting point for a director who was supposed to be the storyteller of the history of a people and a land.

    Define your time, can you find out? John Ford begins his story from that time and focuses on family and love story; There is a woman in the frame of the filmmaker and a man, a woman who has the emotional burden of the story on her shoulders and a man who must protect the family from the dangers outside the home; It's almost the raw material for all of John Ford's westerns, and there's still a battle for honor and, of course, an identity that requires the intervention of a man and a woman in the story.

    Arithmetic worried Claude Colbert about the end result, he worked to portray the complexities of a burning love in the midst of deadly battles, and he portrayed the atmosphere of the film correctly. These are the colors that put the audience in the heart of different situations and engage their emotions. Build, has appeared convincing. With that innocent face, he was a good actor to face an actor like Henry Fonda, who we know more as good storytellers. The chemistry of the two works well together, and John Ford, in addition to telling their love story well, also manages the story of the film's battles and their directing. In this context, watching drums along the mohawk is a must for John Ford moviegoers.

    "In British Columbia, the daughter of a wealthy family named Lana Brest marries a man named Gilbert Martin. They leave that luxurious and comfortable life with their family to be the first farmers to move to a small plot of land in the Mohak Valley. In July 1776, the atmosphere of the revolution rippled throughout America at that time; The people intend to rise up against British colonialism, and the life of this family is undergoing many changes in the context of this revolution

    12. Mr. Roberts (Mister Roberts)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • Actors: Henry Fonda, James Cagney, and Jack Lemon
    • Product: 1955, USA
    • IMDb movie rating: 7.7 Out of 10
    • movie ratings on Raton Tomitoz: 93.

    By making Mr. Roberts's film, John Ford shows that he can handle stories Fun and comedy will do well. If we are used to seeing comedy scenes in his films alongside tragic stories, this time he has made a film that belongs entirely to this genre, and of course in the middle of Marvin Leroy he replaced John Ford, but Mr. Roberts's film is still standing. It has retained its unparalleled bite.

    Mr. Roberts's film is magnificently masterfully crafted. Everything is in place and all the agents have done their job properly. The film's fun atmosphere and verbal jokes make the audience laugh over and over again, and the great actors put the finishing touches on doing so. All of this has made this seemingly warlike film a comedy and entertaining film that satisfies even the most ardent viewer. . He was able to draw well the narrow space of the ship and give it a unique identity environment; An identity that makes this ship not a place to serve and pass, but a place to live. This tight space is given to the filmmaker as one of the winning cards to both make his own jokes and tell about the lives of these men in constant conflict.

    Mr. Roberts's screenplay is adapted from a book by Thomas Hagen. It is brilliantly and perfectly written, and its ping-pong dialogues give actors like Jack Lemon or James Cagney, who were highly skilled in quick dialogue, the opportunity to expand. On the other hand, Henry Fonda shows that he is good at acting in the form of comedy roles, and his presence makes the film sweeter, and of course, his charisma makes the final work more attractive. He is the same charming and kind-hearted man from the previous films who is stuck in a confusing and constant quarrel with an insane captain named James Cagney. It's mostly male in nature, but make no mistake about it; Because the fun atmosphere of the film and the characters' conflicts go beyond this and from somewhere onwards it is tied to human issues. In the middle of the work, Mervyn Leroy replaced John Ford, and this seemed to affect the quality of the final product. But that did not happen, and now that we see Mr. Roberts's film, we are faced with a one-handed work that comes from the mastery of both directors; Leroy did his best to make the Ford sequel work well. .

    . .

    .

    11. (Fort Apache)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1948
    • IMDb : 7.5 10
    • : 100

    . . . 1930 .

    . . .

    . .

    . . .

    . . .

    . .

    . .

    . .

    10. (Young Mr.Lincoln)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1939
    • IMDb : 7.6 10
    • : 100

    . . . .

    . . . . . .

    . .

    . . .

    . . 1939 .

    . .

    9. (The informer)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1935
    • IMDb : 7.4 10
    • : 94

    . . () . . 1940 .

    1920 . 1920 . 1930 .

    . . .

    . . .

    . . . .

    . .

    1922. . IRA . IRA

    8. (She wore a yellow ribbon)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1949
    • IMDb : 7.3 10
    • : 92

    . . . . .

    . (red river) . .

    : . . .

    . . .

    . . .

    . . . .

    .

    7. (The man who shot Liberty Valance)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1962
    • IMDb : 8.1 10
    • : 94

    . . . 1960 . .

    . . . .

    . . . .

    . : . .

    . . . . .

    . . .

    . .

    6. (Stagecoach)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1939
    • IMDb : 7.9 10
    • : 100

    . . .

    . .

    . . .

    . . . . . .

    . 1940 . .

    . .

    . .

    ( ) . . . .

    5. (The grapes of wrath)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1940
    • IMDb : 8.1 10
    • : 100

    . . . .

    . . .

    . . . .

    : . . . . .

    . . . . .

    . . .

    . .

    1930 . .

    4. (The quiet man)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1952
    • IMDb : 7.8 10
    • : 91

    . .

    . . . . .

    . . .

    . . . . .

    . . . .

    . . .

    . . .

    / .

    3. (My darling Clementine)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1946
    • IMDb : 7.8 10
    • : 100

    . . .

    . .

    . .

    . .

    . . . .

    . . .

    . . .

    2. (How green was my valley)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1941
    • IMDb : 7.7 10
    • : 89

    . . .

    . . .

    . . . .

    . . . . .

    . . . .

    (the maltese falcon) .

    . . .

    1. (The Searchers)

    BingMag.com <b>Top</b> 15 <b>John</b> <b>Ford</b> <b>films</b> <b>from</b> <b>worst</b> to <b>best</b> <b>(filmmaker</b> <b>under</b> a <b>magnifying</b> glass)

    • :
    • : 1956
    • IMDb : 7.9 10
    • : 96

    . . . .

    . . . . . .

    . .

    . . .

    . . ( ) .

    . . . .

    2008 2012 . 2022 .

    . .


Tags: top, john, ford, films, from, worst, best, (filmmaker, under, magnifying, glass)

READ NEXT IN: art and cinema / movies and series

BingMag.com 10 Hollywood actors who drowned in their role movies and series

It is generally believed that 10,000 hours of intensive training is necessary to become a master in any field. This rule also applies to acting. Of course, only a handful of actors have achieved such

BingMag.com Top 8 Netflix Original Movies to be released in 2022 movies and series

Netflix has been known as one of the largest video streaming services ever since its inception as a DVD player. From time to time he unveils unprecedented commercial designs. In 2017, for example, it

BingMag.com 10 unique movies about going to the movies! movies and series

The last two years have been difficult years for filmmakers. Quarantine and social restrictions made watching movies take on a different meaning, and screens went out of the way they had adhered to fo

BingMag.com Which films are most eager to watch at the 1400 Fajr Film Festival? movies and series

The ticket sales of Fajr 1400 Festival for the general cinema lovers in Tehran started this morning, and most of the tickets for the films "Lost Man", "Betrayal" and "Private Meeting" started. In less