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Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

"Who is the author of a movie?" There are different views, but the most popular theory is probably the one put forward by Kaye Do Cinema in the 1950s, which has become one of the most talked about topics in modern criticism. Theorists such as Andrew Sarris considered the director to be the main creator of the work, which is in fact the product of his "creative look". In this regard, the "director's signatures" became more important, and those whose works did not have a specific signature were excluded from the circle of the author, such as "Steven Soderbergh", "Robert Zemeckis" or "Robert Wise" (who happened to be good at making films). They know). But what about Edgar Wright, where does he fall into these categories, and can a special place be given to him? Under the pretext of showing "Last Night in Soho", we have examined Wright's filmmaking style.

  • Last night in Soho; Everything we know about Edgar Wright's new film

Among the active filmmakers these days, those who are "ours" should be more admired; Writers and directors who do not distance themselves from the audience and make films for popular culture. Quentin Tarantino, Guillermo del Toro, Peter Jackson, and Steven Spielberg may be talking about films that have emerged from the heart of music, bestsellers, comics, and video games, or that pay homage to revolutionary cinematic films. But we have to add another director to this list: Edgar Wright.

Wright has a unique style of filmmaking and has produced films that redefine their genre. He should be placed next to Tarantino, because his creations have a special feeling at the same time as they pay homage to other films.

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

Like many directors in recent decades, Wright became interested in cinema at the age of three after watching Star Wars, and has worked hard all these years. Is to recreate the feeling he experienced. He also cites "The Evil Man 2" by Sam Remy and "Arizona Growing Up" by the Coen Brothers as works that led him to direct. He began his career making amateur short films, one of which later became "Hot Phase".

Wright made his first feature film in 1995, which is It was a joke with the Western genre and was called "For a Fistful of Fingers". Three years later, in 1998, he co-produced the series Spaced, co-produced by Simon Peg. The series was based on the same traditional sitcom formulas, but Wright and Peg turned it into a series that has many references to popular culture and deals with anything you can imagine (Space can be considered the "Community" series of its time). .

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

The success of the series was the starting point for a collaboration between Wright, Peg and Nick Frost, which culminated in a popular trilogy (The Three Flavors of Corinth), which put the filmmaker on the radar of moviegoers and portrayed him as a talent./p>

Genre as a tool for storytelling

Among all the prequels, sequels, reconstructions, and stereotypes, what is most valuable is watching an "original film"; That is where Edgar Wright shines. When we talk about original films, you may think of works that take home the Oscars or deal with serious and philosophical themes. In the meantime, less attention is paid to comedy or horror, and there is an idea that these genres can not be taken seriously, but it should not be forgotten that "a good film is not related to the genre." Comedy, action, or horror films can be quite innovative in form or, in more detail, in terms of narrative elements; For this reason, Edgar Wright's creations should be taken more seriously, even if they are not "thought" or "blood will rise."

We go into these sections, but what sets him apart, along with his signatures, is his attitude towards genres and his efforts to break down stereotypes. He usually goes to stories that we have seen similar examples in the cinema many times, but as if these stories have become more widespread, why and how? Perhaps the first reason is Wright's correct timing of embedding the elements of the story within the body of the genre in question. Not only does he put the different parts of the story in the right place and present them to the audience at the right time, but he also pays attention to the rhythm of the film and knows when to calm the space and when to speed things up. He pays attention to the specific signs of each genre but does not depend on them.

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

The Dead

Wright has made films in genres we know well that bear little resemblance to other works; Zombie-based movie (Sean of the Dead), action movie (Hot Phase), comic book movie (Scott Pilgrim vs. World), sci-fi movie (End of the World), robbery movie (Baby Driver) and his psychological horror movie (Last Night in Soho), They all depend more on the style and context of the filmmaker than on their genre, and we can call them "Edgar Wright". But what makes these works "Edgar Wright"? Contrary to popular belief, he is not parodying these genres, but using them as a tool to tell his stories. It happens in the world of zombies! "Hot Phase" highlights the difference between urban and rural life, as opposed to "American action movies" that have apparently become the world standard for the genre. The "end of the world" deals more with "human self-destruction" than with space creatures. "Scott Pilgrim" focuses on self-respect and temperament, and "Baby Driver" examines the past and forgetting bitter events.

So the audience communicates differently with the effect. Because instead of focusing on the main elements of the genre (which, of course, are present in the works), the stories and characters are more important. One of the reasons Edgar Wright usually avoids making sequels is that he believes he has presented the main character of the film in a way that has nothing new to say about it (maybe Baby Driver will eventually break that rule). "The reason the Matrix sequels didn't work out is that at the end of the first episode, the main character becomes a god," Wright told Quentin Tarantino. To continue his story, the only thing you can do is "create doubt." The audience thinks that maybe he is not God, but in the end you realize that no change has been made. "

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

What makes Edgar Wright a good filmmaker, along with perfectionism and attention to detail (as are the likes of David Fincher), is that instead of Doubt provides a sure end to knowing the fate of the characters. He does not make his films with the idea that he might sell them and produce his next installment.

Be. The producer should consider a good budget for a film that is completely original, and the leading actors should accept to play a role in it. Each time, Wright goes through this difficult path to build something that he thinks is worthwhile.

Wright deals with serious, personal themes alongside his stories. "The audience may see a story in the form of a comedy or science fiction genre, but they are not willing to watch it in the form of a drama film," he said. For example, the dead can be viewed as a social critique, a work that analyzes the situation in England in the new millennium. Wright also points out that his films are like "Trojan Horse" in which we can immerse ourselves (if you do not know, in ancient Greek mythology, the Greeks gave them a large wooden horse to conquer the city of Troy and a number of soldiers inside They hid it).

We have special expectations from each genre. We want to experience fear with a horror movie like last night in Soho or have fun with a comedy movie. If the filmmaker does not make what we expect from a genre, we will complain, but "the director should not be defined by the genre, this is the genre that should be defined by the director" and Wright gives his own definition of each genre.

Creator of Creative Violence

Wright has the ability to easily push the boundaries of violence. Almost all of his compositions, from The Dead to Last Night in Soho, contain at least one bloody sequence, but these moments do not follow the usual patterns and are accompanied by initiative.

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

Hot Phase

In the Dead, the characters' cold weapons are designed in a way that, in a humorous way, Brutally destroy the zombies (thus creating a conflict); From a turntable to a cricket stick in their hand.

In the hot phase, a triangular piece of stone falls from a building onto a character and replaces his head! (Pictured above) In Scott Pilgrim, characters become coins and points after death. At the end of the world, blue blood is shed from dead people.

  • 10 heartbreaking deaths in horror movies that shock you

Creative use of sounds And music

is the medium of cinema to burn an audio playground, and he uses sound in his films in a bold way. From Baby Driver, where music is played in a timely manner to events, to Scott Pilgrim, whose sounds are literally visualized.

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

Depicting Sounds in Scott Pilgrim

Even in older Wright compositions, sound was not something that was only after the filming was over. And be added to the work in the editing room; He blends this element with the structure and story of his films, such as the sequence in which they behave like DJs, or "Miles" in Baby Driver doing the same thing with a childish musical instrument.

In Wright's work, visual elements seem to play a more important role, but it is the sound that makes them flourish; The sound is usually accompanied by "jump cut", "close-up", "long view" and "dolly zoom". A good example is the moment in the hot phase, "Nicholas Angel" and "Danny" are chased by negative characters: the quick zoom of the camera on Nicholas' fingers, which sounds the siren of a police car, the quick cut to the moment in a magnification The other lightning fastens his belt, and the sound of the belt being fastened is heard; And finally, in the next section, we hear a close-up of the car tire along with the Angel turning. In this sequence, it is the acceleration of the sound that excites the audience in front of the image. , Have harmony. Edgar Wright is a master in this field, and it is not without reason that this type of montage is considered one of his signatures (although we have seen a similar example in the work of other filmmakers, such as "A Lament on a Dream" directed by Darren Aronofsky) .

But Wright does not use a combination of jump cuts (plus other editing techniques) and sound for dramatic moments alone; Most of the time, he weaves quite ordinary everyday moments with these exaggerated sounds to give a different feeling to the moment or create a humorous situation.

He also uses sounds to convey sequences; For example, the moment in the hot phase, the killer of the film hits one of the victims on the head and the scene of his fall is suddenly cut, Nicholas Angel falls on the sofa (the sound of the victim falling is used for both shots). Or where Angel is photographed and at the same time as we hear the sound of the camera flash (and its intense light), we enter a completely different space where a police officer is photographing the crime scene:

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass) BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass) BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

By now you have probably noticed that his style of editing is directly related to sound. In some parts, Wright consciously makes sound an important element of the sequence. In the sequel to The End of the World Hotel, the moment Gary King rings the table bell, the bell does not go off and continues until King ends his monologue (strangely, he changes the atmosphere as well). Or the characters move abnormally with sound. Like the moments in Scott Pilgrim, the characters look at each other or the end-of-the-world scene where Gary King is reading a newspaper and his attention is drawn to a couple of teenagers drinking beer.

So far we've talked about voices. They are thought of in the filmmaking process, or the cause of them is physically seen in the image, but that is not the whole story. In the editing room, Wright incorporates sounds into the film's structure in a more complex and sometimes even body of soundtrack. Like the various scenes in Scott Pilgrim, in which the sound of video games (especially fighting genres) is exaggerated to create action, or in the dead, where they are walking down the street; You can hear the continuous sound of sirens, which highlight the turmoil around him and act as a terrifying soundtrack.

In Baby Driver, Edgar Wright goes a step further and turns sound into a story element. . As a child, Miles suffered a tragic accident and lost his parents. This incident causes him to have "tinnitus". If you watch or actually listen to the film more closely, you will hear a fairly clear frequency for most of the minutes, which is sometimes combined with the soundtrack. This sound is used in the film in a way that is not annoying and, like the ticking of a clock, does not catch the audience's mind most of the time (except for the parts that the filmmaker wants you to pay attention to); At the same time, this frequency also indicates the mental state of the main character.

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

Wright behind the scenes of the end of the world

Wright also usually uses sound for camera shakes and movements, which can affect the audience's sense of humor. Like the sequence of zombies approaching Ed and Shan's car (every movement of the camera has a sound) or in the chase sequences of Baby Driver, you hear the sound of objects passing by the cars. Interestingly, these sounds are synchronized with the music being played and sometimes become part of it. Of course, there is a mix of music and action in his other films as well: from "Don't Stop Me Now" by Queen in "Dead" to "Black Sheep" by Barry Larson in Scott Pilgrim and "Alabama" (The Doors' Edition) At the End of the World. Many of the songs you hear in his films have been chosen for a specific reason. For example, the song "Ghost Town" by the group "Specials", in which the opening of the dead is heard, refers to what is going to happen next, or, according to Wright, the music of the movie "End of the World" shows well that the main character Where does the film come from and what is its background?

For Edgar Wright, every second of a film is an opportunity to focus on the sound, and he does so every time with innovation. In his film, "silence" is absent, and in most minutes, "everything" is in tune with sound or music. In other words, every reaction, every behavior, every character that touches, every facial expression, they all go hand in hand with the sound.

Appreciate editing

Needless to say, Edgar Wright takes a completely different view of editing and uses a variety of techniques, but his turning point should be considered Jump Cut. We mentioned jump cut above, but if you are unfamiliar with it, as its name suggests, it is a slice that jumps over time, meaning that it removes anything extra in the process of delivering a process and focuses on the same thing. Which the filmmaker wants. Few filmmakers use this editing technique cleverly by Edgar Wright.

Wright uses it as a powerful storytelling tool by adding an element of sound to the technique. He creates comedy or injects meaningless moments with passion with the cuts he makes and the crystallization of the impressions in various ways; As a result, watching his montages never gets boring.

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

A clear example can be seen in the opening of your phase; Where Angel is waiting for a taxi in front of the police station. Nicholas hugs a plant and then, with a few different jump cuts, we see him on the subway and on the train, indicating that he is traveling somewhere. On paper, the idea sounds non-cinematic, but Wright has presented it in a way that reveals part of the film's story to the audience without saying a word. This montage informs the viewer of several key issues:

We notice that Nicholas is crossing cities to go to a specific area, and according to the facial expressions of "Simon Peg", we understand This trip or whatever it is, is not happy. Wright's editing adds a faster rhythm to a part of the story that could be boring, and although there is no definite element of humor in the scenes, it is subtly comedic.

In the hot phase, the main character eats breakfast. Available in four views in three seconds with fast zoom:

BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass) BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass) BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass) BingMag.com Take a look at Edgar Wright's sensational cinema (filmmaker under the magnifying glass)

Wright sometimes edits based on the performance or even the movement of the character's eyes; Like the sequence we mentioned a little above, where Gary King is reading the newspaper. As his eyes move and stare at the other side, in the next section, the camera (which suddenly provides a first-person perspective) moves rapidly to where King is staring. . .

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: Focusfeatures, Medium, AtZ Show, Screenrant, Discarded Image, Hollywood Insider


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