The life of the British queen in the world of entertainment

The image of the queen can be seen on banknotes and stamps, she is remembered in sports competitions, she goes to the homes of millions of people every year with her speech on Christmas day. . Thanks to her long and record-breaking reign, it can be said that the Queen is the only royal person that the current British people have seen with their own eyes. But who really is Queen Elizabeth?

BingMag.com The life of the British queen in the world of entertainment

The image of the queen can be seen on banknotes and stamps, she is remembered in sports competitions, she goes to the homes of millions of people every year with her speech on Christmas day. . Thanks to her long and record-breaking reign, it can be said that the Queen is the only royal person that the current British people have seen with their own eyes. But who really is Queen Elizabeth?

Many nonfiction books have tried to answer this question, from The Little Princesses by Marion Crawford, a former royal teacher who published the Royal Palace in 1950 with a It was a disgrace, to the respectable biographies that royal biographers have always written over the years. The duties of the servant become glasses. What these biographers are reluctant to do is shed light on the unspoken aspects of their lives and portray them as human beings. Of course, how is such a thing possible at all? The Queen does not interview, her personal notes are secret, and people close to her are carefully selected.

Although society has changed and we have taken a more personal look at the life of the Queen and her family, these are still They have also been carefully selected and mediated. For example, in 1969 a documentary called "The Royal Family" was shown, depicting a year of living in the royal palace. But despite the fact that the documentary had more than 30 million viewers and was popular across the UK, it has only been fully aired once since.

This year at the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the coronation The Queen was held, BBC Studios aired a 75-minute documentary. The Queen herself narrated the documentary, which featured unprecedented footage of the royal family's personal clips. The documentary, titled "Elizabeth: The Unseen Queen," features images of Princess Elizabeth showing off her ring before her engagement to Prince Philip is made public. As a young mother, she spends time with Prince Charles and her prince, spending time with their uncle, Prince George, Duke of Kent. For this documentary, more than 400 pre-coronation films have been made available to the BBC.

However, the mystery remains. It seems natural that storytellers should look for a way to fill the gap between all that is pre-planned and determined. The Queen's fictional portraits in books, television and cinema not only seek to paint a more complete picture of the woman, they also contain traces of our evolved feelings about the device to which the Queen has dedicated her entire life. p>

Queen in the World of Literature

BingMag.com The life of the British queen in the world of entertainment

In 1988, a play by Alan Bennett called The Question of Authority "was staged at the National Theater in London. The play tells the story of Anthony Blunt, a Cambridge spy and famous twentieth-century British royal art consultant who had a family connection to the royal family. With this performance, Bennett became the first playwright to succeed in portraying a character from the royal apparatus in a play. The queen we see in this play is mischievous and charming. In the play, it is indirectly mentioned that the queen is aware that Blunt is a spy. Although the play portrays the Queen as a complex manager, it also emphasizes her inexplicability.

In this play, Pernella Skills played the role of the Queen. "The combination of a royal character and an ordinary man in his performance was so successful that the audience cheered him on after he left in the middle of the show, which is rare in London," said Frank Rich, a New York Times critic at the time. "It was as if the queen herself was really leaving the hall." Bennett wrote in a note: "I now remember with regret one of the Queen's dialogues in that play, a dialogue which we later deleted during the corrections. "That dialogue was: I do not like people touching me, because there may come a time when they do not do it again." But Su Tanzand, the author, was not like that. In 1992, he published a satirical novel, Me and the Queen. The novel is the story of an anti-monarchist Republican party that comes to power and ousts the royal family from Buckingham Palace. The queen is exiled to the Midlands. It is worth noting that even a stubborn anti-monarch like Townzand leaves little room for kindness in his mockery.

Living in a royal bubble

BingMag.com The life of the British queen in the world of entertainment

Pure strangeness of living in The Royal Bubble, and its ability to separate the people living in the bubble from the rest of society and their inability to perform natural human behaviors (despite all the benefits of such a lifestyle), in Sage Bennett's 2021 novel The Winser Knot, It becomes. Bennett (who has nothing to do with Alan Bennett) is a fan of the Queen. Her father has met her many times, and she herself has once had a job interview for the queen's personal secretary. A scene from the series "Crown" became her source of inspiration and made her turn the queen into a Marple lady in her own palace. In one part of the story, Queen Elizabeth puts a soldier in the wrong place. Bennett believes that this is something the Queen never actually does, because she is very knowledgeable. "Crown" creator Peter Morgan himself previously wrote the screenplay for "The Queen" (2006) for Steven Fires. In that film, Helen Mirren portrays the Queen as a funny, hairless cocoon boss who is shrouded in obscurity after the death of Prince Diana. He has faced an unprecedented crisis during his reign, he has to accept the fact that his famous bride of the past has left him behind and has attracted all the attention. The queen sheds tears in this film, but these tears are not for Diana.

This image of the queen conveys the message that her whole being is summed up in one goal: to protect the kingdom. This view can be seen in the four seasons of the "Taj" series to this day. In the series, Morgan adds a lot of folks to the famous mistakes of the royal family. The Queen's most heinous mistake is the 1966 Abarfan Mining Village disaster, which killed 144 people (mostly children) and left the queen eight days late. The queen Morgan portrays (played by Olivia Coleman) must be reminded that tears are needed here. Here the queen is portrayed as a chief, with absolute power and unshakable judgments. In "Taj", almost everything is in the service of that crown, which is also the name of the series.

The remarkable thing about "Taj" is that this series shows the role of the queen in running the country much more than anything. That is in fact. In the real world, queens may still be on banknotes and stamps, but they are less useful than ever in today's world. However, as the series takes the Queen's reign from decade to decade, she becomes a prism from which we look at history from her point of view. Although the series seldom takes a critical look at the Queen, the widespread success of the series around the world shows that, in the eyes of the people, being in an eternal institution that transcends all forms of fashion is a satisfying opportunity. A place where duty is more important than anything else.

Morgan not only presents a monarchical version of contemporary history, it also shows that the Queen herself is trapped by events and people before her. Is stuck. Like any other monarch, the queen's ultimate duty is to ensure that the throne is properly passed on to her heir. He later realized that the people could be more deadly than the army of any other claiming royal command.

BingMag.com The life of the British queen in the world of entertainment

Love novels about the queen, she inevitably returns to the throne after escaping. Even Su Townsend's "Me and the Queen" has a sequel in which the monarchy returns to its place. There is only one notable exception: The Unusual Singer (2007), a hilarious and lively short novel in which Alan Bennett portrays the Queen again as a fictional hero.

It starts when a Corgi royal dog enters a mobile library and the queen feels she has to borrow a book from that library. When you become addicted to reading books, there is no escape. The queen soon begins to study the classics of Proust, Turgenev, Trolop, and Hardy. Her character is not flawless, but her girlish curiosities and arrogant restlessness make her a pleasant and believable combination. "Oh, a little faster," he says somewhere in the book as he reads one of James' works of art. But the best feature of the book is that in the end she distances herself from the ordinary image we know of the queen. "He could have been indistinguishable from these pages," Bennett himself said. And when reading ends with writing, perhaps the Queen will eventually become the real person that many readers have been looking for for years in royal biographies.

Source: BBC Culture

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