5 important (and embarrassing) Hollywood appointments; From the star lunch with the Soviet Premier to Cameron and Arnold

From James Cameron's first appointment with Arnold Schwarzenegger to make Terminator, to Nikita Khorshev's afternoon date with Hollywood stars, to less fruitful meetings, stories What you read below is a testimony to the power and, of course, a series of side issues of work dates that usually happen over a lunch in Hollywood; Very fateful appointments that have completely changed the course of people's lives and Hollywood.

BingMag.com 5 important (and embarrassing) Hollywood appointments; From the star lunch with the Soviet Premier to Cameron and Arnold

From James Cameron's first appointment with Arnold Schwarzenegger to make Terminator, to Nikita Khorshev's afternoon date with Hollywood stars, to less fruitful meetings, stories What you read below is a testimony to the power and, of course, a series of side issues of work dates that usually happen over a lunch in Hollywood; Very fateful appointments that have completely changed the course of people's lives and Hollywood.

1. Getting to know "The Terminator", the story of the meeting between James Cameron and Arnold Schwarzenegger

It may be hard to believe today, but there was a time in the past when a studio could force James Cameron to have lunch with someone. In 1982, the executives of Hemdale and Orion, the studio behind the film "The Terminator", arranged a business lunch between the young film director and an up-and-coming European actor, Arnold Schwarzenegger. They believed that Schwarzenegger might have the potential to increase the global sales of their six million dollar sci-fi film. A career in bodybuilding and acting, he was considered for the role of Kyle Reese, a brave fighter from the future; In the end, that role was given to Michael Bain. Cameron thought the idea was preposterous given Schwarzenegger's size and work history. As a result, he decided to go on a lunch date and please the studio executives, but spoil the whole thing by starting a fight with Schwarzenegger.

Instead, that lunch marked the beginning of a brotherly friendship that would last for decades between them. It became two men who changed the career paths of both of them. Schwarzenegger charmed Cameron with his eloquence and enthusiasm for the script, and while he was supposed to be trying to get the lead role, he couldn't stop talking about the film's villain.

When Cameron met Schwarzenegger to write. I spoke to him about his book "The Futurist: The Life and Films of James Cameron" (The Futurist: The Life and Films of James Cameron). slow or how to behave like a machine. And apparently, as Schwarzenegger spoke, Cameron began to draw a sketch of his face on the notebook he had brought with him. In his design, he noticed the sharp and bony angle of his jaw. During that lunch date, the two realized they had a lot in common. Both are immigrants, Cameron came from Canada and Schwarzenegger from Austria. Both loved motorcycles, and both were unreasonably confident in their own abilities.

According to Rebecca Keegan of The Hollywood Reporter, a Hamdale studio executive was supposed to pay for the lunch, but Her credit card didn't work and Cameron didn't have any money; So Schwarzenegger ended up paying the price. After they said their goodbyes, Cameron called the studio and told them to drop the idea of Schwarzenegger playing Kyle Reese. "That idea doesn't work," Cameron said. But boy, he's going to be a great destroyer! Thus, the next day, Bashwartzenger Studio signed a contract.

2. Alex Gibney's (documentary) account of an important meeting in Hollywood

I had a lunch date in Newport Beach, California with a man who sponsors the company I work at, Offline Productions, the producer of the films "Slam", "Whiteboys". (Whiteboyz) and "Huntress". A person from the affluent class of society who was said to have shares in the Chateau Mouton Rothschild winery. He promised to show me and my partner and boss, Mark Levin, a path to a profitable future. He introduced us to a lady named Nancy who might partner with us and help solve all our problems.

Nancy told us that she is the daughter of Lucky Luciano (a famous gangster) and a descendant from her mother's side. It is straight from Christ. As I stared into his eyes and he went on and on about how the pope kissed his ring, I felt like I was disassociating from my body and leaving my entire future behind. As I floated toward the graveyard of movies, looking longingly at the salad on the table that was getting smaller and smaller under my feet, I remember the investor saying, "Well, I'm going to go while you sort things out."

3. Narrated by Alex Goldstone, Partner at Anonymous Content

When I was still early in my management career, I was invited to lunch by a very successful independent film producer. While eating, he kept ordering drinks. Soon it was surrounded by such a wall of empty glasses that the waiter had nowhere to put the bill except right in front of me. Later I found out that this was his usual way of working, so that he could pocket a free lunch.

4. The narration of Alex Yarosh, one of the partners and head of the brilliant talent department of "Gersh" talent agency

Me and one of the managers of a We were talking on the phone in the studio. I was thanking them for their support of a client who had landed the lead role in a major movie franchise. They handled the whole process and supported our client in various aspects, from getting the job to swimming against the direction and going against the director's vision. They were really able to make it work.

I said to him: "It would be great if we had a date and had lunch together, I don't know how to thank you for what you did." "You must be too?" he jokingly replied. "Well, not really," I said. "I can send you a gift card and you go without me." "Okay, great," he said. Thus, I also sent him a gift card and when he saw that I did what I said, he was embarrassed by my work. Of course, we had lunch together a few months later, but that initial story led to a long and fruitful friendship.

5. Soviet Premier meets Hollywood stars, the most epic lunch date of all time

Never in the history of Hollywood has there been a lunch date like when Nikita Khrushchev on September 19, 1959, near the height of the Cold War, four days after meeting the President When Eisenhower came to Los Angeles at Camp David in America, it has not been noticed. Stupid; A city that was so affected by the "Red Scare" and the Hollywood blacklist was still running, now it was going to dine with the Soviet Premier. The one who only three years earlier said about the capitalist countries: "We will bury you!"

However, when Khrushchev showed interest in visiting Hollywood, the State Department He arranged for Spiros Skouras, the head of 20th Century Fox, to visit the studio (Skoras himself, of course, had attended the Soviet Film Festival in Moscow the previous month). A situation that the New York Times described as "one of the most unpleasant social tragedies in Hollywood's colorful and colorful history." Invitations were eventually arranged by the Motion Picture Arts Association to ensure attendance from all the major film studios.

According to The Hollywood Reporter's Scott Feinberg, the Saturday afternoon gathering was held at the Caf de Paris. ), described Fox's studio restaurant as "the greatest show ever staged in an elephant studio." Nearly 300 prominent people of cinema surrounded Khrushchev's delegation of 100 people. Marilyn Monroe was flown there from New York and told to wear her skinniest clothes. Pigeon meat, wild rice, Parisian potatoes and peas were served with pearl onions. Skouras and Khrushchev both spoke.

Khrushchev, whose entrance was greeted with a standing ovation from the audience, spoke for forty-five minutes on a variety of topics. In his speech, he also expressed his disappointment that security officers had advised him not to visit Disneyland. Then he was taken to a recording studio to watch the filming of a risque dance for the musical "Can-Can". Fox Studios didn't usually film on weekends, but paid extra to perform that day just for Khrushchev. Newsreel images of the time show him watching the dance with pleasure, while he later told the press that he thought the performance was "very tasteless".

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