How was “Breaking Bad” series influenced by the Western world?

The acclaimed series "Breaking Bad", its sequel "El Camino" and its recently concluded spin-off series "Better Call Sal". They are remembered for their clever influence on various aspects of popular culture. For example, the drug trade and cartel issues in the world of Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould are reminiscent of many gangster works such as "Goodfellas" and "The Sopranos". "Better Call Sal" is influenced by the world of film noir, especially in its use of black and white images. However, as Vince Gilligan said in an interview: "I think of 'Breaking Bad' as a Western in many ways."

BingMag.com How was “Breaking Bad” series influenced by the Western world?

The acclaimed series "Breaking Bad", its sequel "El Camino" and its recently concluded spin-off series "Better Call Sal". They are remembered for their clever influence on various aspects of popular culture. For example, the drug trade and cartel issues in the world of Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould are reminiscent of many gangster works such as "Goodfellas" and "The Sopranos". "Better Call Sal" is influenced by the world of film noir, especially in its use of black and white images. However, as Vince Gilligan said in an interview: "I think of 'Breaking Bad' as a Western in many ways."

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It makes perfect sense if you call this series an example of "amazing stories". "Western". In "El Camino," for example, Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Pal) faces off against a man in a western duel to get the money he needs to escape. But in this world, there is a more direct reference to the Western, a reference to one of the most prominent symbols of Western works, namely the train robbery. Episode 5 of Season 5 "Bad Bucking" is a perfect example of the flourishing of the Western world in the series.

Train robbery has always been one of the basic aspects of the Western genre, from 1903 in a major work such as "The Great Train Robbery" to the year 1969 and popular works such as "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" have been used. This genre is inspired by real-life robbers such as Butch Cassidy who stole a train in the Wild West. Today, popular culture continues to draw inspiration from westerns, especially train heists, as we saw in the Star Wars universe, as well as the second episode of The Boba Fett Series. One of the reasons for this is the high ability of these scenes to create tension and excitement, which brings the audience with them from the time of planning to do it until the final moment. "Breaking Bad" was not left behind and portrayed its own version of the train robbery.

Even though the train robbery itself happens in the last third of this episode, the introduction to it is also the same. The size is tense. Mike (Jonathan Banks), Walter (Bryan Cranston) and Jesse (Aaron Paul) have kidnapped Madrigal's CEO, Lydia (Laura Fraser). The men discovered tracking devices in the methylamine tanks he had provided from the company. Although they accept that Lydia had nothing to do with the tracking devices, they still hold her responsible for messing up their work. In a trade for her life and her daughter's safety, Lydia makes an offer that will provide much more methylamine for Walter and his friends. A train carrying methylamine tanks will leave on a certain date and will enter a dark and dead area for a short time, which will be impossible for the authorities to trace. In other words, the train enters the Wild West at that point, the lawless frontier where train robbers make their living.

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Additionally, the episode includes a brief scene of Walter in his iconic Heisenberg hat as he, Jesse, and Mike inspect the train tracks. With this appearance, he is the same image that is drawn on wanted posters in police offices and the same image that the Salamanca twins used to find him. So wanted posters are another Western icon included in the series.

BingMag.com How was “Breaking Bad” series influenced by the Western world?

However The act of stealing is very stressful. Although Coby (Bill Burr) initially manages to delay the train by stopping his car on the tracks, the presence of good guys willing to help him push the car creates an unexpected disruption to the plan. Walt, always putting his own pride and ambition first, refuses to let go of the plan even after Mike's insistence. This puts Jessie and Todd in a very dangerous position. If the train started moving again, they would be the ones trapped there. Dave Porter's haunting soundtrack also adds to the tension of the scene. The percussive beats in sync with the quick cuts to Jesse and Todd scrambling to replace the bolts and nuts on the Methylamine tank will take any viewer's breath away. The moment the train starts moving, it seems that Walter and the partners have successfully completed their mission. That is, until they turn around and see a boy on a bike who witnessed their crime. Following Jesse and Walt's earlier orders that "no one but us should know about this robbery", Todd immediately pulls out his gun like a cowboy and kills the boy. And its over-the-top excitement highlights some of the Western's core issues. This genre is very much about the relationship between masculinity and violence which often leads to the loss of innocent lives. "You can't live by killing," was what Shane (Alan Ladd) said to Joe (Brandon DeWilde) in the classic western "Shane". In both of these works, a young child witnesses the brutality of men who play the role of hero and villain throughout the Wild West.

BingMag.com How was “Breaking Bad” series influenced by the Western world?

In "Breaking Bad" the death of this boy is a symbol of lost innocence. But in the meantime, not only the boy's life is lost, but Walter White's young student, Jesse Pinkman, also suffers. However, he was a former student of Walter White. Even though he was already living a life of crime before Heisenberg came along, it was Walt who forced him to stay in this dangerous profession. Every time Jesse gets a chance to escape, Walt pulls him under his yoke again. Furthermore, from the very first season, Jesse Pinkman never intended to kill anyone. But bringing a boy's life into the story is Jesse's main red line. But Walt has no problem with risking a child's life. For example, he poisons Jesse's girlfriend's son, Brock, to keep Jesse on his side. In the final scene of this episode, Aaron Paul's performance really captures the agony of Jesse's scream after watching the child die. No matter how hard he tries to stay clean, he still has to live with the guilt of participating in the murder of a child. The same guilt he has in "El Camino" when he tries to seek forgiveness for his life of crime and his responsibility in the death of Brock's mother.

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This episode, Dead Space Rent, is a shining example of how boldly and meticulously Gilligan and Gould went about developing the world of Breaking Bad. Have. As much as they worked in telling the unusual story of the gradual transformation of a chemistry teacher into an ambitious drug manufacturer, they do not shy away from using classical elements in their modern story. That's exactly what the duo did with "Better Call Sal." By extracting the character of Sal Goodman and several other characters from "Breaking Bad", Gilligan and Gould were able to present a completely new narrative centered on the personal tragedy of James McGill in a series that includes both the past and the present.

BingMag.com How was “Breaking Bad” series influenced by the Western world?

In addition to all the above points, this episode of Breaking Bad and all of its other episodes were filmed using a 35mm camera. Therefore, the creators of the series have not only referred to Western classics from the point of view of story and visual effects, but also through technical tools and filming. Finally, this attention to details and paying homage to the history of cinema made "Breaking Bad" a masterpiece that is a special tribute to the Western world. ; Astounding and breathtaking (enduring episodes of series)

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