“ET” movie and the importance of fantasy in childhood; We are not children forever

During the past six decades, Steven Spielberg has become one of the most prolific and respected filmmakers in the world of cinema by creating numerous and unforgettable works. Lasting like "Jaws", "Close Encounter of the Third Kind", "Jurassic Park", "Schindler's List", "Saving Private Ryan", "Catch Me If You Can", "War of the Worlds" and "West Side Story" in his career. You can see why this happened. This director specializes in providing character-centered cinematic experiences that are emotionally rich and immensely satisfying. But for all the enduring works that have Spielberg's name on their resumes, there is one film that, more than any other, is still a strikingly unique extract of the director's identity as a nuanced storyteller: ET: Extraterrestrial.

BingMag.com “ET” movie and the importance of fantasy in childhood; We are not children forever

During the past six decades, Steven Spielberg has become one of the most prolific and respected filmmakers in the world of cinema by creating numerous and unforgettable works. Lasting like "Jaws", "Close Encounter of the Third Kind", "Jurassic Park", "Schindler's List", "Saving Private Ryan", "Catch Me If You Can", "War of the Worlds" and "West Side Story" in his career. You can see why this happened. This director specializes in providing character-centered cinematic experiences that are emotionally rich and immensely satisfying. But for all the enduring works that have Spielberg's name on their resumes, there is one film that, more than any other, is still a strikingly unique extract of the director's identity as a nuanced storyteller: ET: Extraterrestrial.

Like Spielberg's other works in the 70s and early 80s, ET is a genre film rooted in a popular and enduring science fiction narrative. The film began as a sequel to Close Encounters of the Third Kind, had an alien-centric vibe, and was originally titled Night Skies. But "Night Skies" kept getting interrupted, as Spielberg struggled to find an endearing gravity for his story, as evidenced in Susan Lacy's excellent documentary Spielberg, until he co-starred with Melissa Mathison. The writer went along and reworked the film with a story that took a gentler approach to the aliens, but the main acting that made ET the enduring and unforgettable work it is today was the way Spielberg and Matheson's childhood

BingMag.com “ET” movie and the importance of fantasy in childhood; We are not children forever

In the top layer, "extraterrestrial" who is treated with respect, love and special interest It is called "E.T.", it is the driving force behind the narrative that lies at the core of this film's story. He accidentally gets stuck on Earth and is welcomed by a young boy named Elliot Taylor. When a group of military researchers are looking for him, ET experiences life on the planet from the perspective of Elliot and his family and establishes a close relationship especially with Elliot. When the military inevitably enters the story, Elliott and his friends and family must work to free ET and return home. Thematically, though, what Spielberg and Matheson did with ET was make a film about childhood fantasy and their futile battle to hold on to it, a battle that turns children into adults.

ET is a symbol of Elliot's childhood innocence that comes to him when he needs it the most. When ET begins, Elliott's parents have just divorced, and Elliott has a lot of responsibilities to take on. ET is found dead in Hayat's back storage, and no one in the family believes him when Elliott tells them he saw a ghost. This means that only Elliot believes in ET, especially because of his innocence.

This not only makes Elliot find ET, but also establishes a close bond with him and he takes him to his childhood bedroom and shows him his world. Elliot's bedroom is a child's room decorated with Star Wars toys and props, a very real place for Elliot's imaginations to grow. One of the first things Elliot shows ET is how to play with toys, which proves how much Elliot loves letting his mind fly outside the walls of his room.

BingMag.com “ET” movie and the importance of fantasy in childhood; We are not children forever

The first half of "IT" is exclusively committed to creating a place to nurture the imagination and innocence of childhood, not only for the characters but also for the audience. Even Spielberg subtly embellishes the core of ET with bits and pieces from his own childhood. Re-creating Elliott's sequences from John Ford's "The Quiet Man" which is a model for Spielberg, Garrett who sings "Peter Pan" or E.T. who communicates with children through Buck Rogers comic strips but as the story progresses, E.T. is distraught. He is now and is very disappointed to contact the house and the army has also surrounded the house. Here, ET literally means childhood shows that he practically slips into the abyss of the adult analytical nature and is lost.

With the Taylor family home surrounded by military forces, Spielberg's camera takes the audience to the dangerous tunnel and the quarantine state of the house, and this is where "E "T" shows the face of adults. The astonishing side of "E.T.", both as a character and as a film, is being tested and dissected right before the audience's eyes. The adults aren't as enamored with ET as Elliot is, and his siblings see him more as something to be scrutinized rather than truly felt.

When government officials question Michael about the connection between ET and Elliott, Michael replies, Does Elliott believe his thoughts? No, Elliot understands her feelings." Communication between IT and children is driven by emotion, while any communication between IT and adults is seemingly doomed to be driven by reason. This is best represented by a character named Keys, the government agent who leads the search team to find ET, who tells Elliott that he had an encounter with ET once when he was a child, and ever since. So far, he is looking to prove this story.

Keys is an adult who has spent his whole life trying to regain the wonder of his childhood. In many ways he is a dark echo of Eliot. As ET is investigated by the government, Elliott is investigated accordingly. By bringing in Elliot, he is thrown headfirst into the adult world in the second half of ET, and his bedroom, which was previously delightfully personal, special, and imaginary, turns into a cold, calculated, sterilized observatory. . When ET dies, Eliot's imagination and innocence also dies, and in fact, his childhood is literally and metaphorically lost. But when ET comes back from the dead and Elliot and his companions decide to fight for him and save him from the razor of clinical trials of the adult world, they also fight for the wonder of their childhood.

BingMag.com “ET” movie and the importance of fantasy in childhood; We are not children forever

All of this culminates in the sublime final moments of "E.T.", in which Elliot and his friends and family take E.T. to a spaceship. They return themselves. Here, Spielberg and editor Carol Littleton bring the main thematic areas of "IT" to the heart of the story. They avoid cutting the line that is rooted in the narrative, in order to achieve a cut that evokes the emotional roots of the story. As Williams's operatic music soars and ET says goodbye to his fellow Earthlings, he pointed pointedly at Elliott's forehead and says, 'I'll be there.' Much like Wendy in Peter Pan, Elliot knows that he must grow up and that he cannot remain a child forever. But in this moment, ET assures him that the beauty, fantasy and innocence of childhood will always be with him.

In many ways, Spielberg is Elliot himself. He has spent his career capturing the wonder and imagination of childhood and has succeeded in recreating that familiar sense of wonder for generations of moviegoers. With "ET" Spielberg has written an ever-fresh lyric about the stories he loves and for the beautiful act of preserving the imagination of a child in a very enthusiastic and intimate way.

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