12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

As a stereotypical definition, a monster can be considered as a creature that creates fear in the audience of horror genre works; Animals that, of course, mean fear not only in the movie but also in everyday life. Just notice how the beaches became quieter after the movie "Jaws" because of the fear of the cannibal shark.

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

As a stereotypical definition, a monster can be considered as a creature that creates fear in the audience of horror genre works; Animals that, of course, mean fear not only in the movie but also in everyday life. Just notice how the beaches became quieter after the movie "Jaws" because of the fear of the cannibal shark.

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1. King Kong (King Kong)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

It is very unlikely that anyone can avoid feeling sympathy for the 1933 version of King Kong. He's just a big ape, a huge creature that makes you want to stroke his head more than run away in terror. His large size compared to human characters gives rise to the belief that even if he does not look where he steps, he can be a threat to humans. However, because he is a primate, Kong has a very endearing quality to him. His lovability becomes more apparent when he climbs to the top of the Empire State Building.

Kong, who has climbed up the New York Tower with a lady in his arms and stands above the city, seems to rule over all the people of this city. . But before long, a bunch of planes start shooting at this creature and lead to his downfall (both himself and his kingdom). This is the scene that creates the strongest sense of empathy between the audience and King Kong. In this scene, the audience witnesses that this huge monkey slowly realizes that he will not get out of this battle alive. Kong's despairing gestures and body language reveal how the animal is gradually coming to terms with its fate. It is at this moment that we, as viewers, realize that Kong is a sad monster, an animal forced into a crowded city and then slaughtered because of his fear of the unfamiliar environment. This unique stop-motion sequence establishes Kong as one of the most pathetic monsters in the history of cinema.

2. Frankenstein's monster (Frankenstein's monster)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

It can be said that Frankenstein's monster played by Boris Karloff is a character from which other pitiful monsters in horror movies are modeled. This monster will make your heart ache more than it will make you scream in fear. In this film, directed by James Will, Frankenstein's monster is portrayed as a creature driven into a world he does not understand, and the only reason he is known as an evil creature is because he does not understand how conventional society works. His creator has cursed this icon of the world's monsters with rejection, a sense of not belonging and insecurity.

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Pathetic Features Frankenstein's monster is further revealed in his second film appearance, Bride of Frankenstein. The cruelty of the people is evident in this film, especially in the scene where the locals disrupt the friendship between the creature and the blind old man. Frankenstein's monster's excruciating loneliness makes him ask his creator to make him a companion, but even this bride of honor can't stand this monster. Loneliness and repulsion follows this creature everywhere and does not stop him. The powerful tragedy that actually defines the word "Frankenstein" has retained its influence to this day for many reasons.

3. Godzilla (Godzilla)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

Most popular versions of Godzilla were created as a lovable creature for a general audience. Even the version that was in "MonsterVerse" of the 21st century company, despite this Blamed for leading Kong off track, he is again portrayed as a heroic figure. The 1954 remake of Godzilla, which is much darker than later installments in the series such as Son of Godzilla, still portrays the giant lizard as a pathetic figure. Basically, the creation of the creature is related to the human fear of nuclear weapons. This creature, which is a metaphor for the use of the atomic bomb by the American forces against the Japanese people in World War II, warns about the use of nuclear weapons. The movie "Godzilla" not only provides an allegory for the dangers of nuclear war, Rather, it infuses a sense of tragedy into a creature called Godzilla, which was previously known as an absolutely terrifying creature. This creature destroys everything in its path, that cannot be denied. But he never wanted it to even exist in the first place. He is a by-product of humanity's arrogance, not a being seeking to conquer our world and tear it apart. Of course, the black and white design and filming of the movie "Godzilla" has still turned this monster into one of the scariest conceptions of the monster. However, there are still many elements to ensure that the audience at least somewhat sympathizes with Godzilla's problems.

4. Gill-man (Gill-man)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

Some monsters in horror movies have the task of protecting a treasure or a valuable object and keep humans away from it. Others are just hungry and looking to hunt and eat people. But the Black Marsh Monster is not in any of these categories. Known as Gilman, Universal's monster has romantic motivations instead of being violent and bloodthirsty. More specifically, Gilman is infatuated with Kay Lawrence (Julia Adams). This fascination becomes so intense that almost the entire story of the movie "Creature from the Black Lagoon" revolves around Lawrence's kidnapping by Gil-Man and taking him to his residence. But this motivation of Gil-Man's behavior has made him completely unique among movie monsters. The story of this fascination begins when Lawrence and other members of the expedition group he travels with decided to penetrate the territory of this beast. At first, Gilman is just curious until the arrival of these newcomers in his place scares him. Gilman is not a monster that kills people to protect himself, he only defends himself against intruders who invade his territory. Although his appearance may not resemble any ordinary human, Gilman's behavior in the movie "Creature from the Black Lagoon" is completely based on human desires.

5. Gloria's monster (Gloria's monster)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

Great horror movie monsters capable of destroying cities are often more pathetic than they appear. Godzilla, Mothra, Clover, and many other seemingly terrifying beasts appear on the surface to be raging monsters bent on destruction and bloodshed, but usually have more complex psyches and motivations and are less technically "monstrous" villains than human villains. This issue is shown in amazing detail in the movie "Colossal".

In this movie, the audience and the heroine of the movie, Gloria (Anne Hathaway), are faced with incredible scenes of a monster attack on Seoul. The audience quickly learns the nuances of this monster, but the film works in a unique way to reach the depth of the audience's sympathy. Instead of showing the audience that they were wrong about the monster, the film's writer-director Nacho Vigalondo shows the audience that the monster is actually a creature that Hathaway unconsciously controlled while wandering the playground. The beast is a physical manifestation of how Gloria's actions affect others without her even realizing it, and this is a wake-up call to the ripple effects of her behavior. The pitiful nature of the monster in Ghoul Asa comes from seeing it as an allegory to represent parts of Gloria's being. This Godzilla-like creation is a physical manifestation of the defects associated with him. "Ghool-Asa" does a good job of showing the unique idea that monsters in horror movies can be even more human than human characters dressed as monsters.

6. Seth Brundle (Seth Brundle)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum), the hero of David Cronenberg's "The Fly", has a relatively normal life at the beginning of the film. He has a steady job, a burgeoning romance with journalist Veronica Quaife (Geena Davis), and plenty of ambition to change the world with the teleportation pods he's built. While testing the pods, he realizes something has gone wrong: a fly to It has found its way into his teleportation pod. Seth soon realizes that he is becoming a human-fly dual being. As his body deteriorates, he gradually becomes a giant, human-sized insect, devoid of the humanity that made Brundle so endearing at the beginning of the film. Watch and don't sympathize with the monster's plight, especially since Brundle's transformation into said creature was purely coincidental. What was the chance that a fly would enter the teleportation pods that would change the world and set Brundle on the path to becoming a monster? Additionally, Brundel's resistance to what he is becoming heightens the sense of tragedy surrounding his experience. including the last request from her lover who asks her to kill him. The monster in the movie "Fly" is definitely one of the most terrifying monsters in horror movies, but this horror does not stop us from sympathizing with Brundel.

7. Cooper (Cooper)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

In the movie "Super 8", everyday life in an American city is thrown into chaos due to the unexpected escape of an alien creature. Referred to as Cooper, the creature looks a lot like the shark in the movie Jaws and acts as a stealthy creature, capturing and torturing people who are unaware of its presence. At first, Cooper doesn't seem to have any pitiful qualities, and is instead presented as a monster you can unquestionably hate.

But as the story progresses, the film's teenage protagonists realize that Cooper is up to terrible things. He has experienced a lot that no one can imagine. Through investigative footage from the series, the teenagers learn that Cooper has been held captive and tormented by agents of the United States government for years, and that these events have fueled Cooper's long-standing rage against humanity. It is after this that the portrayal of Cooper changes from an emotionless killing machine to a character who only acts on the basis of his own traumas. This becomes apparent in the third act when the main character of "Super 8", Joe Lamb (Joel Courtney), talks to Cooper and tells him that he does not have to give in to anger after the terrible events, and in parallel tries to do so himself. to get over his mother's death. Establishing such an explicit connection between Cooper and the hero of "Super 8" shows that the audience is supposed to sympathize with this monster instead of just being afraid of it.

8. Wallace's walrus (Wallace's walrus)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

Podcaster Wallace Brighton (Justin Long) is not a monster at the beginning of Tusk. But, his insistence on interviewing Howard Howe (Michael Parks), a strange native Canadian, eventually turns him into a monster, and Wallace gradually turns into a sea lion. Trapped in his house, this mad surgeon dismembers Wallace and puts the pieces back together. This story with the body horror genre finally took away the ability to speak from Wallace and he is only able to communicate through muffled screams and roars similar to the sounds of real sea creatures. It's Howard in a situation where Wallace has completely turned into a wild animal, but Howard comes out of the sea lion costume he's wearing. The sight of this scene drives Wallace completely mad, he sinks one of his tusks into her leg, then kills her and enjoys this victory in an animalistic way. From the sheer violence of this scene, it's clear that Wallace has become a monster unlike any other monster in the history of horror movies. However, his unwitting transformation into such a creature makes him a sad and pitiful character, especially in the final scene, which shows Wallace retaining some of his humanity.

9 . Sir Roger McTeam (Sir Roger McTeam)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

The 1953 mystery film The Maze ends with the reveal of who runs the mansion where the main characters have been staying. The residence is owned by Sir Roger McTim, who is a human-sized frog. The monster chases the protagonists across the estate, roaring menacingly. His rage ends when he throws himself out of an upstairs window. After his death, it was explained that McTim was a man who never became human during his embryonic stage. Hence, he was doomed to look like a giant amphibian while possessing human intelligence.

Hazarto has a sad ending. The kind of twist ending that could only exist in a 1950s B-movie horror movie. Considering the scene where he's at the height of his rage, he's practically carried up the stairs by the side characters. Pushed, McTim can't exactly be called terrifying.

However, he has all the characteristics of a horror movie monster that evokes your sympathy. Plus, if you're doomed to spend the rest of your life as an abnormally large frog, you probably won't be in an ideal state of mind.

10. Gwoemul (Gwoemul)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

As the film continues, the government forces become more hostile and falsely declare They say that Gamol carries a virus for population control. By the end of The Host, the government is even willing to use a poison called Yellow Agent to subdue the beast, completely oblivious to the effects of the gas on the general population. Gamul eats people, so it's not like the monster isn't terrifying. But if it wasn't for the actions of powerful people who are the biggest real enemy of the people in the movie "The Host", he wouldn't even exist to scare anyone.

11. The Wolf Man (The Wolf Man)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

Monsters in world cinema often derive their iconic existence from association with the idea that monstrous-looking beasts can have feelings. The monster of the movie "The Wolf Man" is no exception. A great deal of the pathetic nature of this particular creature is due to the story of his creation. While out with his love Gwen (Olynn Ankers), Larry Talbot learns that Gwen's friend Jenny (Faye Helm) is in trouble and Larry tries to save this young lady who was attacked by a wolf. Larry immediately kills the animal with an ornamental cane topped with a silver wolf's head. But before that, the beast, which he later finds out was a werewolf, bites him in the chest. With this bite, Larry is cursed to become a werewolf.

Larry's forced transformation into a violent creature on a full moon is not the result of pride or an ironic punishment for a human flaw, but the result of his efforts to help humans. is another These tragic details give his existence as a werewolf a painful quality. The viewer's heart burns for this man until the third act. Larry tries to leave town to minimize any potential carnage he may cause. But his father comes in and locks him (literally) in his current home. It wasn't Larry's choice to be a werewolf, and he tries to minimize the consequences of the beast's wrath as much as he can. His actions in this direction create a sense of empathy in the audience and make him last in the mind as one of the pitiful monsters of horror movies.

12. Clover (Clover)

BingMag.com 12 monsters of horror movies that bring tears to the audience

In the movie "Cloverfield", the audience doesn't get much information about the mindset of the monster that is destroying New York City. The reason is that the heroes are ordinary people who record the events of the film with a video camera. It doesn't make sense for them (or the viewer) to know much about the creature that is turning everything around them to rubble. It is called "clover" (meaning clover). Speaking to Animation World Network, creature designer Neville Page mentioned that Clover is a baby of its own kind. This monster, separated from his parents and the normal habitat in which he was born, is afraid of all the unknown things around him. It is true that Clover destroys New York in a crazy and terrifying movement, but this creature does not have any malice towards the human race, nor is there a complex evil plan involved. Clover's only motivation is fear of the unknown. Of course, these details don't diminish Clover's terrifying nature. This monster still deals infinite collateral damage. However, this untold story shows us the other side of the plot with a hint of tragedy, making Clover even more pathetic than the film's often awkward human leads.

Source: SlashFilm

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