10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

Disney is one of the most prolific film studios in the world, and most of its productions are family films. Despite classic works such as "The Lion King" and "The Little Mermaid", it can be claimed that almost all people on the planet have watched at least one of the films of this studio, and many of them have been enchanted by the magic of Disney. .

BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

Disney is one of the most prolific film studios in the world, and most of its productions are family films. Despite classic works such as "The Lion King" and "The Little Mermaid", it can be claimed that almost all people on the planet have watched at least one of the films of this studio, and many of them have been enchanted by the magic of Disney. .

Despite being attractive, Disney movies are also predictable in many cases. These works follow a structure that has become a clich due to overuse; The story usually begins with an unfortunate girl in distress and ends with a happy ending. Having said that, despite all their love and affection for Disney animations, the audience gets so confused by hidden stereotypes in some sequences that they prefer to skip watching them.

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    Even the most romantic audiences were disappointed by the repetition of the "love at first sight" clich in Disney works. The probability of this old legendary concept happening in today's world is almost zero, but unfortunately, they are seen in abundance in Disney movies. You may think that this clich is related to classic Disney movies and is not seen in new works, but you would be very wrong because it is an important part of the story in modern works like "Cars" and "Wall-E". .

    Of course, this idea can help the story's appeal, but the reality is that it is so repetitive and so different from real life that it seems spoiled and boring. Real relationships have their own complexities, and usually, fairy-tale love is not achieved by external appearances alone; So maybe it's not bad for Disney to think of showing romantic relationships that bring more complications and challenges to their characters. It can

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    No audience problem with the cute little animals that are the main character's companions and minions. And sometimes they help them, but they don't. Especially the fact that they can be very decisive in creating comedy and fun moments. For example, Mushu the dragon of Mulan is a good example of a useful, cute and beloved animal assistant.

    While these cute animals can increase the appeal of the story, increase the comedy load of the script, and most importantly, an excuse. To talk out loud about the feelings to provide the main character, but sometimes they seem extremely redundant and boring. When in the recent productions of this studio, each character has a pet next to him, which does not have any important role in advancing the story, it seems that Disney is only thinking about making a large number of dolls with the design of the desired animal after The film should be released on the market and make a good profit from selling them to young fans.

    8- One-dimensional loves of male characters

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    When we are on the side of a romantic movie, we usually expect some excitement and romantic challenges. Dynamics, will, enmity, failure, etc. are all part of the romance that every audience expects to face. These elements often disappear in older Disney films because in the eyes of this studio, love is a handsome, rich man who seems to have no particular care in the world except to find a lover.

    Prince Eric in "The Little Mermaid" and Prince Philip in "Sleeping Beauty" is a good example of these characters that make the romance of the film highly unjustified. In any case, Disney needs more complex male interests to maintain the appeal of its works. Of course, characters like Flynn Rider in "Tangled" and Kristoff "Frozen" are examples that show Disney's progress in this field to some extent.

    7- Girls always Helpless

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    More ancient than princes who always tire in love are princesses who are always helpless. . A girl locked in a tower waiting for a prince on a white horse to come and rescue her is too boring and exaggerated for today's audience. Of course, fortunately, Disney has made significant progress in this regard, and there is no mention of this annoying stereotype in its recent works. For example, in "Moana" we are dealing with a strong and dynamic female character who takes control of her own destiny and fights for her dreams. However, many classic Disney films fall into the trap of the princess stereotype. They are trapped helpless and weak. For example, the story of "Hercules" relies on the main role of a man who seeks to save a woman Is she helpless or in "Snow White" we are on the side of a dull and unmotivated girl who is sitting waiting for her prince to come and solve all the problems. Fortunately, with the passage of time, the spell of Disney princesses is broken and women play a very decisive role in the stories.

    6- Black and white moral boundaries

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    In most Disney movies, characters are classified into two categories: good and evil; Without even a brief mention of gray characters. In the real world, right and wrong are never so clear, and the moral boundaries are constantly shifting according to the circumstances, and they cannot be interpreted so easily. Although it is always attractive and satisfying to see good triumph over evil, the reality is not so simple.

    When moral boundaries are questioned but not clearly defined, the characters find different dimensions that make them It makes audiences more engaging and their stories more satisfying. Villains like Mother Gothel or Oscar are only interested in eternal youth or power, but Disney could have created more attractive and even sympathetic anti-heroes by creating more nuanced differences and placing them in the gray spectrum.

    5 - Insisting on sequels

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    It seems that every time Disney launches a successful project market, he insists on building its sequel as quickly as possible and achieving profitability. While some of these sequels do even better than the original films, there are also many mediocre and weak sequels in Disney's repertoire that only had financial aspects. For example, the "Toy Story" franchise has three sequels and one spin-off, and Disney spent 30 years trying to repeat the success it achieved in the 990s.

    In any case. There is nothing wrong with the process of making a sequel, but the main problem is that Disney insists on giving the audience a movie sequel that does not have any smell of the content of the original work. In fact, bringing back the nostalgic characters and themes of classic movies does not guarantee the appeal of the movie sequence and the satisfaction of the audience.>

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    In many Disney animations, heroes are introduced to the audience as beautiful and perfect creatures. In fact, the beauty of their faces is a reflection of their good nature. While most of the villains have an ugly and deformed appearance, which is an expression of their evil nature.

    In reality, a beautiful appearance cannot be a good measure to show a person's moral virtues. There are other complicated ways to recognize a person's noble and kind personality, which ironically have nothing to do with their appearance. Disney characters should not rely solely on their beauty to be "good".

    3- Happy endings are not always realistic

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    Watching a lovely Disney movie with a happy ending is appealing to many audiences, and this clich is so overdone that if a story doesn't end well and happily, It's an understatement, but the reality is that even when the main characters fall in love and ride off into the sunset at the end, they may be dealing with big and small problems in the future that have nothing to do with that beautiful ending.

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    2- Excessive use of repetitive jokes

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    When a joke causes laughter, the easiest thing to do It is to repeat it over and over again throughout the story to get laughs from the audience, but without a doubt, at some point, the audience will get tired and sad because of the lack of new jokes. Modern Disney films have a more comedic approach and rely more on jokes, for example "Inside Out" is full of these jokes.

    To reduce this clich, it is better than every joke once or twice in The length of the film should be used instead of randomly appearing in the story wherever possible. A more minimal approach to the use of jokes can significantly maintain the comedy load of the animation.

    1- Exaggeration of the power of love

    BingMag.com 10 toxic stereotypes of Disney animations

    Love is undeniably a powerful force, but when Disney movies have to be crammed into two hours, it can be an easy, convenient way to end. deliver the story to act; Like when the protagonists break a spell or use the power of love to defeat any villain. Of course, the power of love is not a terrible concept, even for children It's fun to watch, but the main problem is that it seems boring in many sequences due to its over-exaggeration.

    The "power of love" is one of the most enduring clichs in the Disney world and in classic films. And modern it is used a lot. Maybe if this power was a 100 percent solution to many problems in the real world, the audience would welcome seeing it.

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